Abraham Lincoln: The True Story of a Great Life, Volume 1

Front Cover
D. Appleton, 1892 - Presidents
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Contents

I
xix
II
xxxi
III
13
IV
42
V
60
VI
83
VII
119
VIII
134
IX
153
X
191
XI
281
XII
295
Copyright

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Page 94 - But, if the good people in their wisdom shall see fit to keep me in the background, I have been too familiar with disappointments to be very much chagrined.
Page 266 - By general law, life and limb must be protected, yet often a limb must be amputated to save a life; but a life is never wisely given to save a limb. I felt that measures otherwise unconstitutional might become lawful by becoming indispensable to the preservation of the Constitution, through the preservation of the nation.
Page 170 - Resolutions upon the subject of domestic slavery having passed both branches of the General Assembly at its present session, the undersigned hereby protest against the passage of the same. They believe that the institution of slavery is founded on both injustice and bad policy; but that the promulgation of abolition doctrines tends rather to increase than to abate its evils.
Page 201 - I am now the most miserable man living. If what I feel were equally distributed to the whole human family, there would not be one cheerful face on the earth. Whether I shall ever be better, I cannot tell ; I awfully forebode I shall not. To remain as I am is impossible ; I must die or be better, it appears to me.
Page 144 - Whatever woman may cast her lot with mine, should any ever do so, it is my intention to do all in my power to make her happy and contented; and there is nothing I can imagine that would make me more unhappy than to fail in the effort.
Page 264 - And if, so answering, he can show that the soil was ours where the first blood of the war was shed — that it was not within an inhabited country, or, if within such, that the inhabitants had submitted themselves to the civil authority of Texas, or of the United States, and that the same is true of the site of Fort Brown — then I am with him for his justification.
Page 264 - I will not stop now to give my opinion concerning — to involve the two countries in a war, and trusting to escape scrutiny by fixing the public gaze upon the exceeding brightness of military glory, — that attractive rainbow that rises in showers of blood, that serpent's eye that charms to destroy...
Page 321 - Tell me, ye winged winds, That round my pathway roar, Do ye not know some spot Where mortals weep no more ? Some lone and pleasant dell, Some valley in the west, Where, free from toil and pain, The weary soul may rest ? The loud wind dwindled to a whisper low, And sighed for pity as it answered,—
Page 270 - Now, as to the young men. You must not wait to be brought forward by the older men. For instance, do you suppose that I should ever have got into notice if I had waited to be hunted up and pushed forward by older men? You young men get together and form a "Rough and Ready Club," and have regular meetings and speeches.
Page 83 - Mississippi, without permission of the President of the United States or the governor of the State of Illinois," had openly broken the compact.

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