Historical, literary, and artistical travels in Italy, a completer and methodical guide for travellers and artists

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Page 18 - ... berceau, or covered walk of acacias, which commands a prospect of the country, the lake, and the mountains. The air was temperate, the sky was serene, the silver orb of the moon was reflected from the waters, and all nature was silent. I will not dissemble the first emotions of joy on the recovery of my freedom, and, perhaps, the establishment of my fame.
Page 18 - After laying down my pen, I took several turns in a berceau, or covered walk of acacias, which commands a prospect of the country, the lake, and the mountains. The air was temperate, the sky was serene, the silver orb of the moon was reflected from the waters, and all nature was silent.
Page 18 - It was on the day, or rather night, of the 27th of June 1787, between the hours of eleven and twelve, that I wrote the last lines of the last page, in a summer-house in my garden. After laying down my pen, I took several turns in a berceau, or covered walk of acacias, which commands a prospect of the country, the lake, and the mountains. The air was temperate, the sky was serene, the silver orb of the moon was reflected from the waters, and all nature was silent.
Page 105 - Various apartments were assigned to them in the palace, designated by various symbols ; a Triumph for the warriors ; Groves of the Muses for the poets ; Mercury for the artists ; Paradise for the preachers ; and for all, inconstant Fortune.
Page 235 - The ch. is full of his paintings : he is said to have given the design of the front and steeple, and to have worked at the wooden statue of the Virgin ; he is consequently to be seen there as a painter, sculptor, and architect, but especially as a Christian. A chapel founded by him bears his name : he bequeathed a legacy for the celebration of mass there, and left a gold chain of great value to the image of the Virgin of the Rosary. This pious offering was stolen about...
Page 234 - Guercino had for Cento that love of locality if we may so say, of which Italian painters and sculptors have in all ages offered numerous examples: he preferred residing in his native town to the titles and offices of first painter to the kings of France and England ; he had...
Page 232 - ... his different philosophical dialogues in imitation of Plato? I had an opportunity of consulting several well-informed gentlemen of Ferrara on this subject, and I ascertained that not one of them believed this tradition, which is equally contradicted by historical facts and local appearances. There was enough in Tasso's fate to excite our compassion, without the extreme sufferings he must have experienced in this dungeon. Alfonso's ingratitude was sufficiently painful : a slight on the part of...
Page 19 - ... dissemble the first emotions of joy on the recovery of my freedom, and, perhaps, the establishment of my fame. But my pride was soon humbled, and a sober melancholy was spread over my mind, by the idea that I had taken an everlasting leave of an old and agreeable companion, and that whatsoever might be the future fate of my History, the life of the historian must be short and precarious.
Page 307 - Shakes off the dust, and rears his rev'rend head. Then Sculpture and her sister-arts revive; Stones leap'd to form, and rocks began to live; With sweeter notes each rising Temple rung; A Raphael painted, and a Vida sung. Immortal Vida: on whose honour'd brow The Poet's bays and Critic's ivy grow: Cremona now shall ever boast thy name, As next in place to Mantua, next in fame!
Page 234 - The extreme destitution, no less than the fervour of these pilgrims, is painted with great minuteness of detail (even to the patches of the least noble part of their habiliments), without in any way weakening the general effect of this pathetic composition. The ceiling of one room presents a series of horses of various breeds ; there is one superb group of two horses ; another horse at grass, nothing but skin and bone, is a living skeleton of this poor animal.

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