Annapurna, First Conquest of an 8000-meter Peak: (26,493 Feet)

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Globe Pequot, 1997 - Travel - 314 pages
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With grit and courage, members of the French Alpine Club face frostbite, snow blindness, and near death to reach the summit of the uncharted 26,493-foot Himalayan peak, Annapurna.
 

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Contents

FOREWORD
11
CHAPTER
19
THE HIMALAYA
27
THE GREAT ICE LAKE ON THE TILICHO PASS WITH GANGA PURNA
85
COUNCIL OF WAR
98
THE MIRISTI K HOLA
108
vin THE SPUR
119
VILLAGE AND VALLEY OF MANANGBHOT
124
A SHERPA CROSSES THE ICE SLOPE BELOW CAMP IVA AT ABOUT
189
THE ASSAULT
190
TERRAY SNOWBLINDED RETURNING TO CAMP II SUPPORTED
220
THE RETREAT
244
REBUFFAT BEING TAKEN DOWN ON A SLEDGE FROM CAMP I
252
IN THE WOODS OF LETE
261
xvin THROUGH THE PADDY FIELDS
277
SCHATZ SHOWS HERZOG THE BEAUTIFUL SABRE WITH ITS SILVER
308

SHERPAS AT CAMP II EXAMINING THE CAULIFLOWER RIDGE
161
CAMP II
175

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About the author (1997)

Maurice Herzog (b. 1919) is one of the foremost mountaineers in history. He gained international fame in 1950 as the leader of the expedition that summited Annapurna I, the first 8,000-meter peak ever climbed by man. Born in France, he distinguished himself in World War II, winning the Legion d'Honneur and Croix de Guerre, two of his nation's highest military honors. After the war, he took to adventuring, where he found his calling climbing the highest mountains in the world. After leading the Annapurna expedition, which cost him his toes and most of his fingers, he dictated his account of the expedition from his hospital bed. His mountaineering days finished, Herzog turned to politics, where he served his country as a minister of sport.

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