McClure's Magazine, Volume 43

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S.S. McClure, Limited, 1914
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Page 91 - And I saw another mighty angel come down from heaven, clothed with a cloud: and a rainbow was upon his head, and his face was as it were the sun, and his feet as pillars of fire: And he had in his hand a little book open: and he set his right foot upon the sea, and his left foot on the earth...
Page 124 - When thou art in tribulation, and all these things are come upon thee, even in the latter days, if thou turn to the LORD thy God, and shalt be obedient unto his voice ; (for the LORD thy God is a merciful God ;) he will not forsake thee, neither destroy thee, nor forget the covenant of thy fathers which he sware unto them.
Page 91 - For bodily exercise profiteth little: but godliness is profitable unto all things, having promise of the life that now is, and of that which is to come.
Page 43 - Shall we gather at the river Where bright angel feet have trod ; With its crystal tide forever Flowing by the throne of God...
Page 65 - For whosoever hath, to him shall be given, and he shall have more abundance: but whosoever hath not, from him shall be taken away even that he hath.
Page 39 - And he carried me away in the spirit to a great and high mountain, and shewed me that great city, the holy Jerusalem, descending out of heaven from God...
Page 78 - If it contain any added poisonous or other added deleterious ingredient which may render such article injurious to health...
Page 91 - And I went unto the angel, saying unto him that he should give me the little book. And he saith unto me, Take it, and eat it up ; and it shall make thy belly bitter, but in thy mouth it shall be sweet as honey.
Page 103 - Such as are for death, to death ; and such as are for the sword, to the sword ; and such as are for the famine, to the famine ; and such as are for the captivity, to the captivity.
Page 95 - To place any dependence upon militia, is assuredly resting upon a broken staff. Men, just dragged from the tender scenes of domestic life, unaccustomed to the din of ğrms, totally unacquainted with every kind of military skill, which, being followed by a want of confidence in themselves, when opposed to troops regularly trained, disciplined, and appointed, superior in knowledge, and superior in arms, make them timid, and ready to fly from their own

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