Skelling

Front Cover
Delacorte Press, 1999 - Juvenile Fiction - 182 pages
691 Reviews
David Almond’s Printz Honor–winning novel is a captivating modern classic.

Ten-year-old Michael was looking forward to moving into a new house. But now his baby sister is ill, his parents are frantic, and Doctor Death has come to call. Michael feels helpless. Then he steps into the crumbling garage. . . . What is this thing beneath the spiderwebs and dead flies? A human being, or a strange kind of beast never before seen? The only person Michael can confide in is his new friend, Mina. Together they carry the creature out into the light, and Michael’s world changes forever. . . .
 

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User ratings

5 stars
252
4 stars
234
3 stars
143
2 stars
41
1 star
21

Great story, skilful characterisation, poetic prose. - Goodreads
This sort of simplistic style unnerves me as a writer. - Goodreads
Mysterious, supernatural, great storytelling. - Goodreads
Sort of weird at the end...But easy to read. - Goodreads
The plot, to me, was too slow. - Goodreads
Gorgeous, lyrical prose. - Goodreads

Review: Skellig (Skellig #1)

User Review  - Ben - Goodreads

It kept my attention. Read full review

Review: Skellig (Skellig #1)

User Review  - Sylver - Goodreads

I loved the language, the feelings it evokes, the characters. Especially the characters. I wanted a little more at the end. Read full review

All 196 reviews »

Selected pages

Contents

Section 1
1
Section 2
3
Section 3
10
Section 4
12
Section 5
15
Section 6
21
Section 7
24
Section 8
33
Section 18
92
Section 19
98
Section 20
101
Section 21
109
Section 22
122
Section 23
131
Section 24
140
Section 25
150

Section 9
37
Section 10
45
Section 11
53
Section 12
58
Section 13
70
Section 14
73
Section 15
80
Section 16
82
Section 17
88
Section 26
153
Section 27
157
Section 28
163
Section 29
171
Section 30
175
Section 31
179
Section 32
183
Section 33
187
Copyright

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About the author (1999)

David Almond grew up in a large family in northeastern England. He worked as a postman, a brush salesman, an editor, and a teacher but began to write seriously after he finished college. He lives in England with his partner and their daughter.

Bibliographic information