Treasure Island

Front Cover
Kessinger Publishing, 2004 - Fiction - 264 pages
50 Reviews
1921. Macmillan's Pocket American and English Classics texts, edited for use in elementary and secondary schools, with critical introductions, notes, etc. Stevenson's most famous book, Treasure Island is a pirate tale that has immortalized the names Long John Silver and Jim Hawkins. With it's dastardly plot and motley crew of rogues and villains, it seems unlikely that children will ever say no to this timeless classic. See other titles by this author available from Kessinger Publishing.

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Review: Treasure Island (Barnes & Noble Classics Series)

User Review  - Tyler Windham - Goodreads

Treasure Island is one of those books we read in reading circles in grade school, folded across our laps as our eyes eagerly dart over the words as we anticipate what might be coming next. It is a ... Read full review

Review: Treasure Island (Barnes & Noble Classics Series)

User Review  - Dana - Goodreads

The middle of the book dragged on for me but that may have just been because I wanted more action and less sitting around. And because Jim is an impulsive tard. Overall, I would say this was a 3.5 for ... Read full review

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About the author (2004)

Novelist, poet, and essayist Robert Louis Stevenson was born in Edinburgh, Scotland. A sickly child, Stevenson was an invalid for part of his childhood and remained in ill health throughout his life. He began studying engineering at Edinburgh University but soon switched to law. His true inclination, however, was for writing. For several years after completing his studies, Stevenson traveled on the Continent, gathering ideas for his writing. His Inland Voyage (1878) and Travels with a Donkey (1878) describe some of his experiences there. A variety of essays and short stories followed, most of which were published in magazines. It was with the publication of Treasure Island in 1883, however, that Stevenson achieved wide recognition and fame. This was followed by his most successful adventure story, Kidnapped, which appeared in 1886. With stories such as Treasure Island and Kidnapped, Stevenson revived Daniel Defoe's novel of romantic adventure, adding to it psychological analysis. While these stories and others, such as David Balfour and The Master of Ballantrae (1889), are stories of adventure, they are at the same time fine studies of character. The Master of Ballantrae, in particular, is a study of evil character, and this study is taken even further in The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde (1886). In 1887 Stevenson and his wife, Fanny, went to the United States, first to the health spas of Saranac Lake, New York, and then on to the West Coast. From there they set out for the South Seas in 1889. Except for one trip to Sidney, Australia, Stevenson spent the remainder of his life on the island of Samoa with his devoted wife and stepson. While there he wrote The Wrecker (1892), Island Nights Entertainments (1893), and Catriona (1893), a sequel to Kidnapped. He also worked on St. Ives and The Weir of Hermiston, which many consider to be his masterpiece. He died suddenly of apoplexy, leaving both of these works unfinished. Both were published posthumously; St. Ives was completed by Sir Arthur Quiller-Couch, and The Weir of Hermiston was published unfinished. Stevenson was buried on Samoa, an island he had come to love very much. Although Stevenson's novels are perhaps more accomplished, his short stories are also vivid and memorable. All show his power of invention, his command of the macabre and the eerie, and the psychological depth of his characterization.

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