The life and epistles of St. Paul, Volume 2

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C. Scribner & Co., 1867 - Religion
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Page 93 - For unto you it is given in the behalf of Christ, not only to believe on him, but also to suffer for his sake ; 30 Having the same conflict "which ye saw in me, and now hear to be in me.
Page 373 - For this people's heart is waxed gross, and their ears are dull of hearing, and their eyes they have closed; lest at. any time they should see with their eyes, and hear with their ears, and should understand with their heart, and should be converted, and I should heal them.
Page 23 - But evil men and seducers shall wax worse and worse, deceiving, and being deceived.
Page 473 - I have fought the good fight, I have finished the course, I have kept the faith : henceforth there is laid up for me the crown of righteousness, which the Lord, the righteous judge, shall give to me at that day : and not only to me, but also to all them that have loved his appearing.
Page 296 - Whereupon, as I went to Damascus with authority and commission from the chief priests, at midday, O king, I saw in the way a light from heaven, above the brightness of the sun, shining round about me, and them which journeyed with me.
Page 333 - And now I exhort you to be of good cheer; for there shall be no loss of any man's life among you, but of the ship.
Page 459 - Lord of lords; who only hath immortality, dwelling in the light which no man can approach unto; whom no man hath seen, nor can see: to whom be honour and power everlasting. Amen.
Page 302 - Then the mariners were afraid, and cried every man unto his god, and cast forth the wares that were in the ship into the sea, to lighten it of them.
Page 313 - And the next day we touched at Sidon And Julius courteously entreated Paul and gave him liberty to go unto his friends to refresh himself.
Page 56 - And the eye cannot say unto the hand, "I have no need of thee:" nor again the head to the feet, "I have no need of you.

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