Human Nature and the Social Order

Front Cover
Scribner, 1922 - Human biology - 460 pages
 

Contents

I
1
II
33
III
49
IV
79
V
134
VII
166
VIII
209
X
262
XI
291
XII
315
XIII
356
XIV
400
XV
420
Copyright

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Page 114 - Thou art the grave where buried love doth live, Hung with the trophies of my lovers gone, Who all their parts of me to thee did give; That due of many now is thine alone: Their images I loved I view in thee, And thou (all they) hast all the all of me.
Page 277 - went into the Temple, and began to cast out them that sold and bought in the Temple, and overthrew the tables of the money-changers and the seats of them that sold doves.
Page 160 - Love took up the harp of life and smote on all the chords with might; Smote the chord of self, that, trembling, passed in music out of sight.
Page 113 - Thy bosom is endeared with all hearts, Which I by lacking have supposed dead, And there reigns love, and all love's loving parts, And all those friends which I thought buried. Thou art the grave where buried love doth live,
Page 152 - requires that rare mean betwixt likeness and unlikeness, that piques each with the' presence of power and of consent in the other party. . . . Let him not cease an instant to be himself. The only joy I have in his being mine is that the not mine is mine. . . . There must be very two before there can be very one.
Page 318 - Dear to us are those who love us, . . . but dearer are those who reject us as unworthy, for they add another life; they build a heaven before us whereof we had not dreamed, and thereby supply to us new powers out of the recesses of the spirit, and urge us to new and unattempted performances.
Page 194 - of departing from truth for the sake of making an impression. "For instance," he says in his autobiography, "I once gathered much valuable fruit from my father's trees and hid it in the shrubbery, and then ran in breathless haste to spread the news that I had discovered a hoard of stolen fruit.
Page 320 - and ask what feature all great periods of revival, of expansion of the human mind, display in common, we shall find, I think, simply this; that each and all of them have said to the human being, 'the inmost nature of the reality is congenial to powers which you possess'";*
Page 292 - than the process of their gradual change! In the beginning they inhaled it unknowingly; you and I may have sent some of our breath toward infecting them, when we uttered our conforming falsities or drew our silly conclusions: or perhaps it came with the vibrations from a woman's glance.
Page 171 - If you have writ your annals true, 'tis there, That, like an eagle in a dovecote, I Fluttered your Volscians in Corioli; Alone I did it.—Boy I

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