Walkers' new and instructive series of rural dialogues

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1877
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Page 8 - I WANDERED lonely as a cloud That floats on high o'er vales and hills, When all at once I saw a crowd, A host of golden daffodils, Beside the lake, beneath the trees, Fluttering and dancing in the breeze. Continuous as the stars that shine And twinkle on the Milky Way, They stretched in never-ending line Along the margin of a bay: Ten thousand saw I at a glance, Tossing their heads in sprightly dance.
Page 8 - ... Along the margin of a bay: Ten thousand saw I at a glance, Tossing their heads in sprightly dance. The waves beside them danced, but they Outdid the sparkling waves in glee : A poet could not but be gay, In such a jocund company : I gazed — and gazed — but little thought What wealth the show to me had brought : For oft, when on my couch I lie In vacant or in pensive mood, They flash upon that inward eye Which is the bliss of solitude ; And then my heart with pleasure fills, And dances with...
Page 2 - THERE is a flower, a little flower, With silver crest and golden eye, That welcomes every changing hour, And weathers every sky. The prouder beauties of the field In gay but quick succession shine, Race after race their honours yield, They flourish and decline. But this small flower, to Nature dear, While moons and stars their courses run, Wreathes the whole circle of the year, Companion of the Sun. It smiles upon the lap of May, To sultry August spreads its charms...
Page 4 - Like worth unfriended and unknown, Yet to my British heart more dear Than all the torrid zone. Thrice welcome, little English flower ! Of early scenes beloved by me, While happy in my father's bower, Thou...
Page 12 - Take but the humblest lily of the field, And if our pride will to our reason yield, It must by sure comparison be shown, That on the regal seat great David's son, Array'd in all his robes and types of power. Shines with less glory than that simple flower.
Page 8 - THE wretch, condemn'd with life to part, Still, still on hope relies ; And every pang that rends the heart, Bids expectation rise. Hope, like the glimmering taper's light, Adorns and cheers the way ; And still, as darker grows the night, Emits a brighter ray.
Page 7 - Coming ere the spring-time, to tell of sunny hours. While the trees are leafless ; while the fields are bare, Buttercups and daisies spring up here and there.
Page 9 - In the month of May, namely, on May-day in the morning, every man, except impediment, would walk into the sweet meadows and green woods, there to rejoice their spirits with the beauty and savour of sweet flowers, and with the harmony of birds, praising God in their kind...
Page 7 - What to them is weather! What are stormy showers! Buttercups and daisies — Are these human flowers! He who gave them hardship And a life of care, Gave them likewise hardy strength. And patient hearts to bear.
Page 2 - Wreathes the whole circle of the year, Companion of the Sun. It smiles upon the lap of May, To sultry August spreads its charms, Lights pale October on his way, And twines December's arms.

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