Ancient Angels: Conceptualizing Angeloi in the Roman Empire

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BRILL, Mar 5, 2011 - Body, Mind & Spirit - 181 pages
Although angels are typically associated with Judaism, Christianity, and Islam, Ancient Angels demonstrates that angels (angeloi) were also a prominent feature of non-Abrahamic religions in the Roman era. Following an interdisciplinary approach, the study uses literary, inscriptional, and archaeological evidence to examine Roman conceptions of angels, how residents of the empire venerated angels, and how Christian authorities responded to this potentially heterodox aspect of Roman religion. The book brings together the evidence for popular beliefs about angels in Roman religion, demonstrating the widespread nature of speculation about, and veneration of, angels in the Roman Empire
 

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Contents

The Words of Angels
1
Chapter Two Angels of the Aether
19
Chapter Three Angels of a Pagan God
47
Chapter Four Angels of the Grave
77
Variations on Local Angelos Veneration and Christian Reaction
105
Christian Angelos Veneration in Late Roman Anatolia
137
Conclusion
167
Bibliography
169
Index
179
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About the author (2011)

Rangar H. Cline, Ph.D. (2005) in History, Pennsylvania State University, is Lecturer in Religious Studies and History at the University of Oklahoma and Assistant Supervisor of the Vicus ad Martis Excavations in Italy.

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