Peace Process: American Diplomacy and the Arab-Israeli Conflict Since 1967

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University of California Press, Jan 1, 2001 - Political Science - 488 pages
At various times in recent years, the Arab-Israeli conflict has seemed to be moving toward resolution, propelled forward by impressive acts of statesmanship. At other moments, the parties to the conflict seem hopelessly mired in fear and violence, unable to bridge the gaps that separate them. One message of Peace Process is that the United States has had, and will continue to have, a crucial role in helping Israel and her Arab neighbors reach peace. If American presidents play their role with skill, they can make a lasting contribution. But just as likely, they may misread the realities of the Middle East and add to the impasse by their own errors.

This new edition of Peace Process brings the story up to date through the crucial Israeli election of May 1999. Two new chapters on the Clinton Administration have been added. The text has been streamlined and revised and new sources have been consulted, resulting in a compact, authoritative, and timely version of this classic study of American diplomacy in the Middle East. Related documentary material is available on easily accessible Web sites that will be kept current for students and scholars.

Copublished with the Brookings Institution
 

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Contents

Introduction
1
Johnson and
23
Nixon Rogers
55
Stalemate
98
Kissinger and the Disengagement
130
Carter
177
Forging EgyptianIsraeli Peace
205
Whos in Charge?
245
Bush and Baker
290
Clinton the Facilitator
321
Distractions Hesitation
341
Challenges Facing Future Administrations
379
Notes
397
Bibliography
463
Index
469
Copyright

Shultz Tries Again
269

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About the author (2001)

William B. Quandt is Byrd Professor of Government and Foreign Affairs at the University of Virginia and a nonresident senior fellow at the Brookings Institution. During the 1970s, he twice served on the staff of the National Security Council with responsibility for the Middle East and North Africa. His previous books include Between Ballots and Bullets (1998) and Camp David (1986).

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