A Biographical History of the Eby Family: Being a History of Their Movements in Europe During the Reformation and of Their Early Settlement in America

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Hett & Eby, printers, 1889 - Berlin (Ont.) - 144 pages
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Page 49 - EBY" (see page 5), was born in May, 1701. He was a lad of sixteen years of age when he came with his father to America. He learned the carpenter trade in his young days, but in after years he followed that of blacksmithing and farming. — He was married to an English girl (of Quaker descent) by the name of Maggie Davis.* They had a family of five children, two sons and three daughters. Two of the daughters died in infancy and the other was married to a Mr. Clemson, an Englishman. Of the two sons,...
Page 49 - Eby8 and his Descendants. David Davis Eby3 was born at Roland's Mills, near New Holland, and near the present line of Earl and Leacock Townships, in Lancaster *From Bishop Benjamin Eby's Records. County, Pennsylvania, in the year 1742.* When but a young man he left home and went to Virginia, where...
Page 3 - ... Palatinate" or Pfaltz, thence to Pennsylvania, United States, and later on their forming settlements in different parts of other States and the Dominion of Canada. The Ebys belong to the Celts, an ancient race of people of Asiatic origin, who formerly inhabited southern, central and western Europe. During the early ages they lived in the northern part of Italy, where they were brought from heathendom to the worshipping of the true and living God through the labors of the Vaudois (Waldenses),...
Page 4 - Landis, Eby and others. Some of these names are of Teutonic origin, which proves that the Vaudois had accessions from that source after their arrival in Switzerland. As early as 1683 we find in some old records that JACOB EBY was ordained a Bishop of the Mennonite Church in Canton Zurich. The State party again getting the ruling power into their hands, laid the Mennonites open to persecution, and not wishing to resist the authority of State, a number of these Mennonites left Switzerland and went...
Page 12 - ... easy, grave and dignified. An acquaintance of his who had heard some of the most noted orators of the State and Nation, in and out of the pulpit, gave it as his opinion, that for none of them, it seemed, had nature done so much towards making the Orator as for this grand old servant of the Lord and his church.
Page 11 - ... suffering and death. Old as the story had become, the audience never tired listening to it from the eloquent lips of Peter. When he slowly arose, all noise subsided into an almost painful expectation. Then he would break the silence with a kind and fatherly greeting to his hearers, and glide gently into the course marked out for himself. Proceeding step by step, describing, explaining, illustrating and sustaining his points as he went along, with copious quotations from the Scriptures, for all...
Page 12 - Father to forgive; the darkening of the heavens, the quaking of the earth, and the elements bearing witness, in thunders and lightnings to the divinity of Him that was suffering. All this he would portray in a manner so vivid that the speaker would be forgotten in the subject. Then, as his voice, suppressed by emotion, and sinking into silence, would allow the attention of his hearers to return to the speaker, he would stand before them, tears streaming down his cheeks, his countenance glowing, and...
Page 5 - These sons were all skilled in the various mechanical arts, so that with their assistance the old ancestor THEODORUS built a mill and erected such other buildings as were needed, without employing persons outside of the family, except for the purpose of burning charcoal to supply the smith forge, which process they themselves did not sufficiently understand.!
Page 12 - ... for all of which he drew upon his extraordinary memory, he would gradually warm up in his theme, and, when under full sway, his discourse moved along like a deep, clear stream, rolling oceanward, without a break or ripple, grand, majestic, and irresistible. His powers, however, were brought out most fully when he came to portray the acts and sufferings of his Master during his last few days upon earth. The scene in Gethsemane ; the sleeping disciples ; the noise and tumult breaking upon the stillness...

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