Plato's Meno

Front Cover
Cambridge University Press, Feb 17, 2011 - History - 473 pages
This 1961 edition of Plato's Meno was originally edited by R. S. Bluck, Senior Lecturer in Greek at the University of Manchester. Its value lies in the incredibly extensive preliminary chapters provided by Bluck, designed to truly enhance the reader's engagement with this ancient text. In almost 150 pages of introductory chapters, Bluck reviews the argument of the Meno, its relation to wider philosophical and dialogues (written both before and after Plato), and summarises Plato's use of the hypothetical method in the Meno, the Phaedo and the Republic. He also provides a detailed synopsis of Plato's Meno before presenting the full Greek text, accompanied by a wide-ranging and incredibly accessible commentary. Finally, Bluck presents the reader with indices in both English and Greek, ensuring that this volume remains an endlessly rewarding reference and research work.
 

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Contents

A The Argument of the Meno
1
Conclusion p
19
v The Arguments for the Absence of Teachers of Virtue p
25
B Recollection in other dialogues
47
Transmigration and Recollection before Plato
61
The Hypothetical Method
75
E The Date of the Meno
108
F The Setting and the Characters I 20
120
G The Evidence for the Text
129
The Geometrical Problem at 86 e sq
441
Select Bibliography
462
Greek
471
Copyright

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About the author (2011)

Plato was born c. 427 B.C. in Athens, Greece, to an aristocratic family very much involved in political government. Pericles, famous ruler of Athens during its golden age, was Plato's stepfather. Plato was well educated and studied under Socrates, with whom he developed a close friendship. When Socrates was publically executed in 399 B.C., Plato finally distanced himself from a career in Athenian politics, instead becoming one of the greatest philosophers of Western civilization. Plato extended Socrates's inquiries to his students, one of the most famous being Aristotle. Plato's The Republic is an enduring work, discussing justice, the importance of education, and the qualities needed for rulers to succeed. Plato felt governors must be philosophers so they may govern wisely and effectively. Plato founded the Academy, an educational institution dedicated to pursuing philosophic truth. The Academy lasted well into the 6th century A.D., and is the model for all western universities. Its formation is along the lines Plato laid out in The Republic. Many of Plato's essays and writings survive to this day. Plato died in 347 B.C. at the age of 80.

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