The Nurture Assumption: Why Children Turn Out the Way They Do, Revised and Updated

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Simon and Schuster, Feb 24, 2009 - Family & Relationships - 448 pages
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This groundbreaking book, a Pulitzer Prize finalist and New York Times notable pick, rattled the psychological establishment when it was first published in 1998 by claiming that parents have little impact on their children's development. In this tenth anniversary edition of The Nurture Assumption, Judith Harris has updated material throughout and provided a fresh introduction.

Combining insights from psychology, sociology, anthropology, primatology, and evolutionary biology, she explains how and why the tendency of children to take cues from their peers works to their evolutionary advantage. This electrifying book explodes many of our unquestioned beliefs about children and parents and gives us a radically new view of childhood.
 

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Moving beyond the nature/nurture divide
In advising parents to ignore hectoring experts, Judith Rich Harris’s book still packs a punch 10 years on. But its use of evolutionary theory and social
psychology to explain how people are ‘shaped’ leaves much to be desired...
Review continued here: http://www.spiked-online.com/index.php?/site/reviewofbooks_article/6601/.
 

Contents

Nurture Is Not the Same as Environment
1
Nature Nurture and None of the Above
31
Separate Worlds
51
Other Times Other Places
73
Human Nature
91
Us and Them
115
In the Company of Children
136
The Transmission of Culture
171
Dysfunctional Families and Problem Kids
272
What Parents Can Do
309
The Nurture Assumption on Trial
330
Personality and Birth Order
343
Testing Theories of Child Development
357
Notes
371
References
397
Acknowledgments
430

Gender Rules
204
Schools of Children
225
Growing Up
248
About the Author
447
Copyright

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About the author (2009)

Judith Rich Harris is the author of No Two Alike: Human Nature and Human Individuality . A former writer of college textbooks, Harris is a recipient of a George A. Miller award, given to the author of an outstanding article in psychology. She is an independent investigator and theoretician whose interests include evolutionary psychology, social psychology, developmental psychology, and behavioral genetics.

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