Women in Love

Front Cover
Cambridge University Press, May 21, 1987 - Fiction - 633 pages
23 Reviews
D. H. Lawrence's Women in Love - 'the beginning of a new world', as he called it - suffered in the course of its revision, transcription, and publication some of the most spectacular damage ever inflicted upon one of his books. Until now no text of Women in Love has ever been published which is faithful to all of Lawrence's revisions. This edition, edited by scholars in England and America, clears the text of literally thousands of accumulated errors allowing its readers to read and understand the novelist's work as he himself created it. The edition includes the 'Foreword' Lawrence wrote in 1919 and two preliminary and discarded chapters which have attracted widespread critical and biographical discussion. The introduction gives a full history of the novel's composition, revision, publication and reception, and notes explain allusions and references; the textual apparatus records all variants between the base-text and the first printed editions.
  

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Review: Women in Love (Brangwen Family #2)

User Review  - Eva 夢 - Goodreads

This book made me dislike Lawrence =) So long lasting and boring... Read full review

Review: Women in Love (Brangwen Family #2)

User Review  - Vanessa - Goodreads

Ugh. Melodramatic, self-indulgent, insufferable characters. Serious overuse of the word 'inchoate' and too many descriptions of characters' shining eyes. Written in a very overblown and bombastic ... Read full review

All 20 reviews »

Contents

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Copyright

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About the author (1987)

D(avid) H(erbert) Lawrence was born on September 11, 1885. His father was a coal miner and Lawrence grew up in a mining town in England. He always hated the mines, however, and frequently used them in his writing to represent both darkness and industrialism, which he despised because he felt it was scarring the English countryside. Lawrence attended high school and college in Nottingham and, after graduation, became a school teacher in Croyden in 1908. Although his first two novels had been unsuccessful, he turned to writing full time when a serious illness forced him to stop teaching. Lawrence spent much of his adult life abroad in Europe, particularly Italy, where he wrote some of his most significant and most controversial novels, including Sons and Lovers and Lady Chatterly's Lover. Lawrence and his wife, Frieda, who had left her first husband and her children to live with him, spent several years touring Europe and also lived in New Mexico for a time. Lawrence had been a frail child, and he suffered much of his life from tuberculosis. Eventually, he retired to a sanitorium in Nice, France. He died in France in 1930, at age 44. In his relatively short life, he produced more than 50 volumes of short stories, poems, plays, essays, travel journals, and letters, in addition to the novels for which he is best known.

About the Author:
David Farmer is Reader in History at Reading University and a Fellow of the Royal Historical Society.

Lindeth Vasey is Editorial Manager: Classics at Penguin UK Ltd. She has edited several books in The Cambridge Edition of the Works of D. H. Lawrence including Mr Noon and (with John Worthen) The First 'Women in Love'.

John Worthen is Emeritus Professor of English at the University of Nottingham and was until 2003 Director of the D. H. Lawrence Research Centre there. He is author of several books on D. H. Lawrence, notably D. H. Lawrence: The Early Years, 1885 1912 (1991), the first volume in the three-volume Cambridge biography of D. H. Lawrence, and D. H. Lawrence: The Life of an Outsider (2006), and editor of a number of volumes in The Cambridge Edition of the Works of D. H. Lawrence. He is also author of The Gang: Coleridge, the Wordsworths and the Hutchinsons in 1802 (2002).