Collins's Peerage of England; Genealogical, Biographical, and Historical, Volume 1

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F. C. and J. Rivington, Otridge and son, 1812 - England
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Vol 1-9

Contents

I
xvii
II
40
III
41
IV
42
V
43
VI
44
VII
45
VIII
46
XI
201
XII
211
XIII
220
XIV
242
XV
251
XVI
260
XVII
300
XVIII
360

IX
48
X
142
XIX
452
XX
489

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Page 363 - Divi Britannici, being a remark upon the lives of all the kings of this isle, from the year of the world 2855, unto the year of grace 1660.
Page 395 - Neither is there wanting daily, handsome occasion to retire, were it not for grinning honour. For let occasion be never so handsome, unless a man were resolved to fight on the parliament side, which, for my part, I had rather be hanged, it will be said without doubt, that a man is afraid to fight. If there could be an expedient found to salve the punctilio of honour, I would not continue here an hour. The discontent that I and other honest men receive daily, is beyond expression.
Page 187 - first son, and the heirs male of his body ; and in default of such issue, to the use of...
Page 93 - Set me whereas the sun doth parch the green, Or where his beams do not dissolve the ice, In temperate heat where he is felt and seen; In presence prest of people, mad or wise; Set me in high or yet in low degree, In longest night or in the shortest day, In clearest sky or where clouds thickest be, In lusty youth or when my hairs are gray.
Page 211 - she was a woman of great beauty, but most enormously vicious and ravenous; foolish, but imperious ; very uneasy to the King, and always carrying on intrigues with other men, while yet she pretended she was jealous of him.
Page 234 - A CENTURY OF THE NAMES AND SCANTLINGS OF SUCH INVENTIONS, as at present I can call to mind to have tried and perfected which (my former notes being lost) I have, at the instance of a powerful Friend, endeavoured now in the year 1655 to set these down in such a way as may sufficiently instruct me to put any of them in practice.
Page 345 - February 1689, passed by an overwhelming majority with only one vote against, which stated that King James the Second having endeavoured to subvert the Constitution of the Kingdom, by breaking the original contract between King and People; and by the advice of Jesuits and other wicked Persons, having violated the fundamental laws and withdrawn himself out of the Kingdom hath abdicated the Government, and that the Throne is thereby vacant.
Page 121 - ... habit, could not but conclude him to be a great person, his garb and fashion drawing more observation than did the rich apparel of others ; so that it was a common saying of the late Earl of Carlisle, ' Here comes the Earl of Arundel, in his plain stuff, and trunk hose, and his beard in his teeth, that looks more like a nobleman than any of us.
Page 338 - Protestant re" ligion, are in great danger from Popery, and " that either this Parliament must suppress the " power and growth of Popery, or else that " Popery will soon destroy, not only Parliament, " but all that is near and dear to us.
Page 268 - The first peer of the name, the first purchaser of the grants, was a Mr. Russell, a person of an ancient gentleman's family raised by being a minion of Henry the Eighth. As there generally is some resemblance of character to create these relations, the favourite was in all likelihood much such another as his master.

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