The Virile Powers of Superb Manhood: How Developed, how Lost, how Regained

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Physical Culture Publishing Company, 1900 - Hygiene, Sexual - 237 pages
 

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Page 27 - The sin of self-pollution is one of the most destructive evils ever practised by fallen man. In many respects it is several degrees worse than common whoredom, and has in its train more awful consequences. It excites the powers of nature to undue action, and produces violent secretions, which necessarily and speedily exhaust the vital principle and energy- hence the muscles...
Page 28 - ... miserable existence, till, superannuated even before he had time to arrive at man's estate, with a mind often debilitated even to a state of idiotism, his worthless body tumbles into the grave, and his guilty soul (guilty of self-murder) is hurried into the awful presence of its Judge ! Reader, this is no caricature, nor are the colourings overcharged in this shocking picture.
Page 66 - Lechery, sir, it provokes, and unprovokes; it provokes the desire, but it takes away the performance : therefore , much drink may be said to be an equivocator with lechery: it makes him, and it mars him; it sets him on , and it takes him oil; it persuades him, and disheartens him; makes him stand to, and not stand to; in conclusion, equivocates him in a sleep, and, giving him the lie, leaves him. Macd. I believe drink gave thee the lie last night. Port. That it did, sir, i...
Page 27 - ... the muscles become flaccid and feeble, the tone and natural action of the nerves relaxed and impeded, the understanding confused, the memory oblivious, the judgment perverted,• the will indeterminate and wholly without energy to resist; the eyes appear languishing and without expression, and the countenance vacant ; appetite ceases, for the stomach is incapable of performing its proper office ; nutrition fails ; tremors, fears, and terrors are generated; and thus the wretched...
Page 29 - Nature designs that this drain upon the system should be reserved to mature age, and even then that it be made but sparingly. Sturdy manhood, in all its vigor, loses its energy and bends under the too frequent expenditure of this important secretion ; and no age or condition will protect a man from the danger of unlimited indulgence, legally and naturally exercised.
Page 219 - In the various reports now published, more than 80,000 cases have been submitted to experiment, by means of which it has been perfectly established that syphilis is cured in a shorter time, and with less probability of inducing secondary syphilis, by the simple treatment.
Page 197 - This discharge may continue ror months, and in many cases for years. In most cases of gleet the discharge is the only symptom. In some instances, however, there may be a feeling of uneasiness in the organ or peritoneum, or an itching about the glands, which may either be constant or attendant only upon the passage of the urine. In some cases the discharge is constant, and sufficiently copious to stain the linen, but in the majority it is perceptible only in the morning on rising. It is a well-established...
Page 188 - ... and moistened with a small quantity of colorless and viscid fluid, which glues the lips of the meatus together. This moisture, after a time, loses its clear, watery appearance, and assumes a milky hue.
Page 205 - ... to the general system ; nor does one attack afford the slightest protection against a second. They differ in that the poison of gonorrhoea may arise spontaneously, while that of the chancroid, so far as we know, never thus originates ; that gonorrhoea chiefly affects the surface — true ulceration being rarely induced — and, in its complications, most frequently attacks parts connected with the original seat of the disease by a continuous...
Page 95 - ... by most effectually cramping, inflaming, and weakening the vital apparatus, and stopping the flow of life at its fountain-head. It slowly, but surely, takes the lives of tens of thousands before they marry, and so effectually weakens and diseases as ultimately to cause the death of millions more. No tongue .can tell, no finite mind conceive, the misery it has occasioned, nor the number of deaths, directly and indirectly, of young women, bearing mothers, and weakly infants it has occasioned ;...

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