Hypnosis: A Brief History

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John Wiley & Sons, Mar 30, 2009 - Psychology - 240 pages
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Hypnosis: A Brief History crosses disciplinary boundaries to explain current advances and controversies surrounding the use of hypnosis through an exploration of the history of its development.
  • examines the social and cultural contexts of the theories, development, and practice of hypnosis
  • crosses disciplinary boundaries to explain current advances and controversies in hypnosis
  • explores shifting beliefs about the nature of hypnosis
  • investigates references to the apparent power of hypnosis over memory and personal identity
 

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Had a great start, but needs to focus more so on the history of hypnosis and not just the innovators of hypnosis...Does that make any sense?

Contents

CHAPTER 1 TRILBY AND SVENGALI
1
CHAPTER 2 ANIMAL MAGNETISM AND MAGNETIC SLEEP
12
CHAPTER 3 MAGNETISM AND HYPNOSIS
31
CHAPTER 4 BODY AND SOUL
54
CHAPTER 5 SALPÊTRIÈRE AND NANCY
76
CHAPTER 6 LABORATORY AND CLINIC
98
CHAPTER 7 STATE AND TRAIT
120
CHAPTER 8 MEMORY AND IDENTITY
143
CHAPTER 9 PRESENT AND FUTURE
166
References
187
Index
213
Copyright

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About the author (2009)

Judith Pintar is a historical sociologist whose work focuses on trauma and mental illness. She is a research associate in the Department of Sociology and the Russian, East European, and Eurasian Center at the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign. She has written numerous book chapters and articles and is the author of two books.

Steven Jay Lynn is a leading clinical psychologist and hypnosis expert. He is a professor of psychology at the State University of New York at Binghamton, and the author of 14 books and more than 250 articles and chapters. His work has been featured in the New York Times, the Discovery Channel, and Science News.

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