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ANDOVER THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY.

NECROLOGY,

1899-1900.

PREPARED FOR THE ALUMNI ASSOCIATION AND PRESENTED

AT ITS ANNUAL MEETING, JUNE 13, 1900,

BY C. C. CARPENTER, SECRETARY.

Second Printed Series, No. 10.

BOSTON:
BEACON PRESS: THOMAS TODD, PRINTER, 14 BEACON STREET.

1900.

INDE X.

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Class.
1861. WALTER S. ALEXANDER
1857. SAMUEL J. AUSTIN
1846. JAMES M. BAILEY.
1861. WILLIAM M. BARBOUR .
1858. Lucius E. BARNARD
1873. WALTER M. BARROWS
1861. AUGUSTUS BERRY
1853. SHEARJASHUB BOURNE
1869. WILLARD D. BROWN
1841. JOSEPH A. CANFIELD
1851. LUCIAN W. CHANEY
1868. JOHN W. CHURCHILL
1834. J. JAY DANA
1835. BELA FANCHER
1846. DANIEL L. FURBER
1857. EDWARD C. GUILD
1838. SAMUEL HARRIS
1856. ISAAC S. HARTLEY
1894. JOHN R. HORNE, JR.
1849. JOSHUA HUNTINGTON
1882. HENRY N. KINNEY
1848. ORPHEUS T. LANPHEAR
1874. HENRY MARSH.
1837. JOHN W. MERRILL
1855. HUGH MCLEOD
1856. EDWARD ORTON
1849. RICHARD OSBORNE
1867. CHARLES M. PALMER
1831. EDWARDS A. PARK
1847. HENRY S. PARKER
1837. EBENEZER G. PARSONS
1834. JOSEPH L. PARTRIDGE
1843. ARIEL E. P. PERKINS
1837. JOHN PIKE .
1864. EDWARD G. PORTER
1863. GEORGE A. RockWOOD
1859. ROBERT SAMUEL
1856. GEORGE E. SANBORNE
1845. RICHARD S. STORRS .
1870. CHARLES R. TREAT
1870. THOMAS J. VOLENTINE.
1858. GEORGE L. WALKER
1847. THOMAS WILSON

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NECROLOGY.

ALUMNI

OLASS OF 1834. John Jay Dana. (Non-graduate.)

Son of Stephen Winchester Dana and Esther Rumsey; born in Poultney, Vt., November 5, 1811; fitted for college at Castleton (Vt.) Academy, under Solomon Foot, afterwards United States Senator; entered Williams College in 1827, spent two years there, and completed his course at Union College, graduating in 1831; studied in this Seminary, 1831-33, and graduated at Princeton Seminary, 1834; licensed to preach by the Presbytery of New York, in the lecture room of the Brick Church, New York City, October 14, 1834. He was ordained by the Presbytery of Troy, at Waterford, N. Y., September 9, 1835; was stated supply at Pittstown, N. Y., from January, 1835, to April, 1836, and at Blissfield, Mich., 1836–38; commenced preaching at Canaan Four Corners, N. Y., in 1838, was ordained pastor in 1840, and remained there until 1848; pastor at South Adams, Mass., 1848–58; without charge, Troy, N. Y., 1858–61; acting pastor, Cummington, Mass., 1861–65; at North Becket, Mass., 1866–74; without charge, Hinsdale, Mass., and in the South, 1874-76; acting pastor, Alford, Mass. (supplying also the church at West Stockbridge), 1876–84; without charge, Alford, 1884-89; acting pastor at Curtisville (in Stockbridge), Mass., 1889-91; afterwards resided without charge at Williamsville, Mass. (in West Stockbridge, although his postoffice was at Housatonic), until his death.

Mr. Dana's father, who was the son of Rev. Nathan Dana, a Baptist minister in Massachusetts and Vermont, removed, in the son's boyhood, to Troy, N. Y., where he was a prominent business man, president of a bank and of one of the first railroads in the country, running from Troy to Greenbush. The son inherited, and preserved to the last, great physical and intellectual energy and vigor. After retiring from the ministry he again took up pastoral work and preached till he was fourscore, being then the oldest minister in Massachusetts in active service. His frequent letters to the secretary, up to the year of his death, spoke of his continued activity both in the exercise of sawing wood and in preaching occasionally in neighboring churches. He found time, during his laborious pastorates, to write four Sunday School books - Caroline Jones, Too Big for Sunday School, Mrs. Marsh's Help, and Humpy Dumpy, -and many newspaper articles on geology, a science in which he was much interested.

Rev. Arthur J. Benedict, of Housatonic, whose church he attended, writes of Mr. Dana: “He once made this characteristic remark, that, having preached for sixty years, he was now trying to be a decent sort of a parishioner' — and he certainly succeeded!” From the funeral address of Rev. L. S. Rowland, D. D., of Lee, Mass. (Class of 1863), as published in the Berkshire Evangel,

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the following extracts are made: “Mr. Dana is the last surviving example among us of the old-fashioned country minister. He seemed to me as complete a type of that class of men as can well be imagined. Born and nurtured in an age of faith, they were all men of faith through and through, and could preach the gospel without any of the reservations that often hinder pulpit efficiency today. ... Mr. Dana was essentially a home missionary all his life, always ministering to weak and struggling churches, and apparently never aspiring to anything else. The value of the service of the country ministers of New England through the earlier and middle decades of the century, in molding the life and shaping the religious ideals of successive generations, is beyond estimate. Mr. Dana's part in this work, however unpretending, persevered in for sixty years, must have been of untold value to the churches of this region. . . A striking peculiarity of Mr. Dana was the easy and happy manner in which he bore the burden of his years. Indeed, his age hardly seemed to be a burden at all. He escaped the trials naturally incident to outliving one's own generation by living thoroughly into the next one. Apparently he had no fears from modern changes and new opinions, even when he did not share them, but always seemed cheerful, even optimistic in his view of the future. . His religion was in almost perfect degree of the typical New England kind, unimaginative, unemotional, undemonstrative, but firm and steadfast as the Berkshire hills among which sixty years of his ministry were spent, and beneath whose shadow his body is fittingly to rest."

Mr. Dana married, July 13, 1836, Mary Abigail Freeman, of Salem, N. Y., daughter of Andrew Freeman and Elizabeth Martin. She died July 17, 1849. He married, second, December 11, 1850, Sarah Esther Converse, of Windsor, Mass., daughter of Amasa Converse and Esther Walker. She died August 28, 1896. His son, Rev. Stephen W. Dana, D. D., has been, for over thirty years, pastor of the Walnut St. Presbyterian Church, Philadelphia. His two daughters reside in Morristown, N. J., one of them being the principal of a well-known young ladies' seminary there.

Mr. Dana died of heart failure, at Williamsville, Mass., June 18, 1899, aged eighty-seven years, seven months, and thirteen days.

Joseph Lyman Partridge. (Non-graduate.)

Son of Dea. Cotton Partridge and Hannah Huntington Lyman; born in Hatfield, Mass., June 7, 1804; fitted for college under the tuition of his reverend grandfather at Hatfield, and at Hopkins Academy, Hadley, under the tuition of Rev. Dan Huntington (father of Bishop F. D. Huntington) and of Worthington Smith (Class of 1819), afterward president of the University of Vermont; graduated at Williams College, 1828. He was instructor in a classical school at Freehold, N. J., 1828–29, and in the Berkshire Gymnasium, Pittsfield, Mass., 1829–31; studied in this Seminary, 1831–32; was tutor in Williams College, 1832–33, and principal of Leicester (Mass.) Academy, 1834-46; associate editor of the Puritan Recorder, Boston, 1846-54, living at Auburndale, where he built the first private residence. He was then a merchant in New York City, 1854-58, residing in Brooklyn, and in business at Lawrence, Mass., from 1858 to 1878, being paper manufacturer, 1858-61, superintendent of schools, 1861–63, deputy U. S. collector of internal revenue, 1862–75, and

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treasurer of the J. C. Hoadley steam engine manufacturing company, 1875–78. He afterward resided in Brooklyn, N. Y., until his death.

The Alumni Association, at its last annual meeting, June 7, 1899, sent Mr. Partridge a message of congratulations, that being his ninety-fifth birthday. He retained his scholarly tastes, reading, until he was past eighty-five years old, his Virgil every summer, and a chapter in his Greek Testament every Sunday. To his last year he kept the use of his faculties unimpaired, and an active interest in the progress of public events. The long life and strong character of this man, the oldest of Andover's alumni, is doubtless due, in some measure, to his descent from successive generations of the best Puritan stock of Massachusetts and Connecticut - the Lyman, Huntington, Dwight, Strong, and Parsons families being among his ancestors, and one line on his father's side extending back to Rev. John Cotton of Boston, and Governor Simon Bradstreet of Andover. His mother was the daughter of Rev. Joseph Lyman, D. D., fifty-six years pastor at Hatfield, and the second president of the American Board. A younger brother was Kev. George Cotton Partridge, of the Class of 1838, who died in 1893.

Rev. Richard S. Storrs, D. D., of Brooklyn, N. Y. (Class of 1845), pastor of the Church of the Pilgrims, with which Mr. Partridge had long been connected as member and deacon, sends the following tribute: “Gentleness and strength were remarkably combined in the mind and spirit of the beloved 'Deacon Partridge.' Descended from a long line of honorable and Godfearing ancestors, trained in a typical New England home and church of the early part of the century, educated in the best institutions of the time, and himself for many years occupying high educational positions, he was in his maturity, and indeed to the end of his long life, as fine an example as can be found of a cultivated, conscientious, faithful and honored Christian layman. The strong religious convictions, which one might almost say were his by inheritance, certainly which had been wrought in him by assiduous training in childhood and youth, were steadfast and vital with him to the end before more sustaining and animating than in his last years; yet he was always most kindly in feeling and manner, most genial in intercourse with all who met him, to a noticeable degree sympathetic with states of mind widely different from his own, and always eager to put his conceptions of truth frankly and freely at the service of any who might inquire concerning them. The missionary spirit was central and urgent in him. He never forgot that his grandfather had been one of the early presidents of the American Board, but his love for that institution, and for its work, came not from this fact; it had descended upon him from the Saviour of the world, and was constantly renewed by all that he saw or learned of mankind. He therefore contributed effectively, systematically, to maintain and invigorate this spirit in the church — by regular and generous efforts of his own, by earnest appeals and prayers in the Christian assemblies, and by earnest representations to individuals whom he could properly approach. As an officer of the church under my pastorate for many years, he was constantly near to my heart: patient and faithful in affectionate service to those in need; wise in counsel; diligent in the prompt performance of every duty; as fully trusted and beloved by his associates in office, and by the church at large, as any officer whom I have ever known. The life of the Master had gone into his life. His profound and fervent convictions were the

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