The National Reader: A Selection of Exercises in Reading and Speaking, Designed to Fill the Same Place in the Schools of the United States, that is Held in Those of Great Britain by the Compilations of Murray, Scott, Enfield, Mylius, Thompson, Ewing, and Others

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Richardson, 1832 - Readers - 276 pages
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OCLC Number: 270900074
Related Subjects:(2)
Recitations.
1832.
LCCN:PE 

Contents

Criminality of Intemperance H Ware Jr
27
The Worm Missouri
29
Debt and Credit Trenton Emporium
31
The Indians of North America Cincinnati Nat Republican
33
Story and Speech of Logan Jefferson
35
Grandeur and Interest of American Antiquities T Flint
43
The American Indian as he was and as he is C Sprague
47
The Grave a Place of Rest Mackenzie
49
Obedience to the Commands of God rewarded Moodie
50
Promises of Religion to the Young Alison
57
On the Swiftness of Time Johnson
58
Obidahthe Journey of a Day Id
62
The Vision of Mirza Addison
66
The Widow and her Son C Edwards
72
The Little Man in Black W Irving
75
The same concluded Ibid
78
Danger of being a good Singer London Literary Chronicle
82
Lenon Piye 41 T 10 Country Clergyman Goldsmith
84
Parody on The Country Clergyman Blackwoods Ed Mag
86
Elegy on Mrs Mary Blaize Goldsmith
88
The Sick Man and the Angel Gay
89
The Voice of the Seasons Alison
90
Anecdote of Richard Jackson London Quarterly Review
91
Description of Niagara Falls Howison
92
Niagara Fallsfrom the Spanish U S Literary Gazette
96
Cataract of Terni Anonymous
98
A West Indian Landscape MalteBrun
101
Devotional Influences of Natural Scenery Blackwoods Ed Mag 102
102
Passage of the Shenandoah through the Blue Ridge Jefferson
105
The Blind Boy Bloomfield
106
A Thought on Death Mrs Burbauld
107
Sunday Evening Bowring
109
The Star of Bethlehem J G Percival
110
The Funeral of Maria Mackenzie
111
A LeaffromThe Lifeofa LookingGlass Miss J Taylor
113
The silent Expression of Nature Anonymous
117
A Thought Blackwoods Edinburgh Magazine 1H 62 Fidelity Wordsworth
119
Industry necessary to Genius V Knox
121
Story of Matilda Goldsmith
123

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Page 211 - Written, 1825. The breaking waves dashed high On a stern and rock-bound coast; And the woods, against a stormy sky, Their giant branches tossed ; And the heavy night hung dark, The hills and waters o'er, When a band of exiles moored their bark On the wild New England shore. Not as
Page 144 - and said, My father, if the prophet had bid thee do some great thing, wouldest thou not have done it ? how much rather, then, when he saith to thee, Wash, and be clean ? Then went he down, and dipped himself seven times in Jordan, according to the saying of the
Page 36 - fully glutted my vengeance. For my country, I rejoice at the beams of peace : but do not harbour a thought that mine is the joy of fear. Logan never felt fear. He will not turn on his heel to save his life. Who is there to mourn for Logan ?—Not one." LESSON XVII. ' Geehale—An Indian Lament.—Statesman,
Page 85 - cliff, that lifts its awful form, Swells fiom the vale, and midway leaves the storm, Though round its breast the rolling clouds are spread, Eternal sunshine settles on its head. Beside the bed where parting life was laid, And sorrow, guilt, and pain, by turns
Page 233 - dead, Dost in these lines their artless tale relate, Haply, some hoary-headed swain may say, " Oft have we seen him, at the peep of dawi Brushing, with hasty steps, the dews away, To meet the sun upon the upland lawn.
Page 144 - But Naaman was wroth, and went away, and said, Behold, I thought, He will surely come out to me, and stand, and call on the name of the Lord his God, and strike his hand over the place, and recover the leper. Are not Ab'ana and Pharpar, rivers of Damascus, better than all the waters of Israel ? may I not wash in them,
Page 85 - Though round its breast the rolling clouds are spread, Eternal sunshine settles on its head. Beside the bed where parting life was laid, And sorrow, guilt, and pain, by turns dismayed, The reverend champion stood. At his control Despair and anguish fled the struggling soul; Comfort came down, the trembling wretch to raise, And his last, faltering accents whispered praise.
Page 69 - not these, O Mirza, habitations worth contending for ? Does life appear miserable, that gives thee opportunities of earning such a reward ? Is death to be feared, that will convey thee to so happy an existence ? Think not man was made in vain, who has such an eternity reserved for him." I gazed with inexpressible pleasure on those
Page 85 - the bed where parting life was laid, And sorrow, guilt, and pain, by turns dismayed, The reverend champion stood. At his control Despair and anguish fled the struggling soul; Comfort came down, the trembling wretch to raise, And his last, faltering accents whispered praise.
Page 260 - it; they cannot reach it. It comes, if it come at all, like the outbreaking of a fountain from the earth, or the bursting forth of volcanic fires, with spontaneous, original, native force. The graces taught in the schools, the costly ornaments and studied contrivances of speech, shock and

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