The Gamekeeper at Home: Sketches of Natural History and Rural Life

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Smith, Elder, & Company, 1880 - Country life - 219 pages
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Page 62 - The monarch oak, the patriarch of the trees, Shoots rising up, and spreads by slow degrees ; Three centuries he grows, and three he stays, Supreme in state, and in three more decays...
Page 62 - Dryden :— The monarch oak, the patriarch of trees, Shoots, rising up, and spreads by slow degrees; Three centuries he grows, and three he stays Supreme in state, and in three more decays.
Page 16 - I gets the fresh air, you see ; and the fresh air is the life, sir. There's the smell of the earth, too — 'specially just as the plough turns it up — which is a fine thing ; and the hedges and the grass are as sweet as sugar after a shower. Anything with a green leaf is the thing, depend upon it, if you want to live healthy.
Page 17 - I drinks ale : but most in general I drinks no strong liquor. Great coat ! — cold weather ! I never put no great coat on this thirty year. These here woods be as good as a topcoat in cold weather. Come off the open...
Page 10 - TN personal appearance he would be a tall man were it not that he has contracted a slight stoop in the passage of the years, not from weakness or decay of nature, but because men who walk much lean forward somewhat, which has a tendency to round the shoulders. The weight of the gun, and often of a heavy game-bag dragging downwards, has increased this defect of his figure, and, as is usual after a certain age, even with those who lead a temperate life, he begins to show signs of corpulency. But these...
Page 120 - Heth, what good shall my life do me ? " appears to animate the breasts of gregarious creatures of this kind. Rooks intermarry generation after generation ; and if a black lover brings home a foreign bride, they are forced to build in a tree at some distance. Near large rookeries several such outlying colonies may be seen. The rabbit, failing to find a cover, hides in the grass and dry rushes ; but across the meadow, stealing along the furrow, comes the weasel; and, shift his place how he may, in...
Page 11 - ... mahogany; sun and tempest have left their indelible marks upon his face; and he speaks from the depths of his broad chest, as men do who talk much in the open air, shouting across the fields and through the copses. There is a solidity in his very footstep, and he stands like an oak. He meets your eye full and unshirkingly, yet without insolence; not as the labourers do, who either stare with sullen ill-will or look on the earth. In brief, freedom and constant contact with nature have made him...
Page 15 - It's indoors, sir, as kills half the people ; being indoors three parts of the day, and next to that taking too much drink and vittals. Eating's as bad as drinking ; and there ain't nothing like fresh air and the smell of the woods. You should come out here in the spring, when the oak timber is throwed (because, you see, the sap be rising, and the bark strips then), and just sit down on a stick fresh peeled — I means a trunk, you know- — and sniff up the scent of that there oak bark. It goes...
Page 16 - I'm told, to live in the pine forests to cure 'em : I say these here oaks have got every bit as much good in that way. I never eat but two meals a day — breakfast and supper: what you would call dinner — and maybe in the middle of the day a hunch of dry bread and an apple. I take a deal for breakfast, and I'm rather lear [hungry] at supper; but you may lay your oath that's why I'm what I am in the way of health. People studs theirselves, and by consequence it breaks out, you see.
Page 17 - ... with a green leaf is the thing, depend upon it, if you want to live healthy. I never signed no pledge ; and if a man asks me to take a glass of ale, I never says him no. But I ain't got no barrel at home ; and all the time I've been in this here place I've never been to a public. Gentlemen give me tips — of course they does ; and much obliged I be ; but I takes it to my missus. Many's the time they've...

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