Contemporary Intellectual Property: Law and Policy

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Oxford University Press, 2007 - Law - 960 pages
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This important new book offers a unique perspective on intellectual property law unrivalled among intellectual property textbooks available today. Beyond providing a thorough and up-to-date account of intellectual property law, the text examines the complex policies that inform and guidemodern IP law at the domestic (including Scottish), European and international levels, giving the reader a true insight into the discipline and the shape of things to come. The focus is on contemporary challenges to intellectual property law and policy and the reader is encouraged to engagecritically with the subject matter. This book is written with the undergraduate firmly in mind and the authors make extensive use of practical examples, exercises and visual aids throughout the text to enliven the subject and stimulate the reader. The book is accompanied by a web site where students and lecturers alike can access updates on major developments in the law, guidance on answering the discussion points provided in the book, web links and further reading.
 

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Contents

About this book
xiv
Walkthrough guide to the educational features of this book
xvi
Guide to the Online Resource Centre
xviii
Table of cases
xix
Table of legislation
xliii
Table of statutory instruments
li
Table of international treaties and conventions
liii
List of figures
lv
Copyright
31
Design protection
251
Patents
357
Registered trade marks
537
Common law protection of intellectual property
711
The European dimension
797
Exploitation enforcement remedies and cross border litigation
863
Index
947

Abbreviations
lvii
Introduction
1

Common terms and phrases

About the author (2007)


Professor MacQueen is Professor of Private Law at University of Edinburgh and his main research interests are in the history of law, and in various areas of private law, including intellectual property, contract, delict and unjustified enrichment. He has published a wide range of books and articles in these areas. He also has an active interest in legal education, and has published an introductory guide to the study of Scots law. Charlotte Waelde is senior lecturer in law at the University of Edinburgh and is co-director of the Arts and Humanities Research Centre for Studies in Intellectual Property and Technology Law Her main research interests revolve around intellectual property and the Internet both individually and together. Graeme Laurie is senior lecturer in law at the University of Edinburgh and co-director of the Arts and Humanities Research Centre for Studies in Intellectual Property and Technology Law (http://www.law.ed.ac.uk/ahrb/). His research interests include the role of law in promoting and regulating science, medicine and technology.

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