Our Game

Front Cover
Ballantine Books, 1996 - Fiction - 352 pages
1 Review
"FURIOUS IN ACTION...TAKES US BY THE NECK ON PAGE ONE AND NEVER LETS GO."
--Chicago Sun-Times
With the Cold War fought and won, British spymaster Tim Cranmer accepts early retirement to rural England and a new life with his alluring young mistress Emma. But when both Emma and Cranmer's star double agent and lifelong rival, Larry Pettifer, disappear, Cranmer is suddenly on the run, searching for his brilliant proté gé , desperately eluding his former colleagues, in a frantic journey acros Europe and into the lawless, battered landscapes of Moscow and southern Russia, to save whatever of his life he has left....
"IRRESISTIBLE...A sinuous plot, leisurely introduced, whose coils become increasingly constricting. There is crisp, intelligent dialogue, much of it riding an undercurrent of menace. And there is a hero who does not see himself as heroic but who struggles with inner demons as much as with the forces arrayed against him."
--Time
"AS THRILLING AS LE CARRÉ GETS...The novel has the heartstop duplicity of A Perfect Spy and some of the outraged honor of The Night Manager and The Little Drummer Girl."
--The Boston Globe
"GRIPPING."
--The Christian Science Monitor
A NEW YORK TIMES NOTABLE BOOK
 

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Selected pages

Contents

Section 1
1
Section 2
24
Section 3
50
Section 4
67
Section 5
84
Section 6
114
Section 7
137
Section 8
149
Section 10
188
Section 11
222
Section 12
248
Section 13
268
Section 14
279
Section 15
309
Section 16
338
Copyright

Section 9
168

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About the author (1996)

David John Moore Cornwell writes bestselling espionage thrillers under the pseudonym John le Carré. The pseudonym was necessary when he began writing, in the early 1960s, because at that time le Carré held a diplomatic position with the British Foreign Office and was not allowed to publish under his own name. Originally inspired to write intrigue because of a 1950s scandal that revealed several highly-placed members of the British Foreign Office and Secret Service to be Soviet agents, or "moles," the plots of most of le Carré's books revolve around Cold War espionage. His own position with the Foreign Office, as well as his earlier service with the British Army Intelligence Corps, gave him an intimate knowledge of Britain's espionage bureaucracy and of Cold War politics. When his third book, The Spy Who Came in from the Cold, became a worldwide bestseller in 1964, le Carré left the foreign service to write full time. The Spy Who Came in from the Cold, which was also adapted to film, featured spymaster George Smiley, who was introduced in le Carré's first book, Call for the Dead (published in the U.S. as The Deadly Affair) and also appears in A Murder of Quality; Tinker, Tailor, Soldier, Spy; The Honourable Schoolboy; and Smiley's People. Le Carré has received numerous awards for his writing, including the Grand Master Award from the Mystery Writers of America (1986), and the Diamond Dagger from the Crime Writers Association (1988). In addition to The Spy Who Came in from the Cold, several of his other books have been adapted for television and motion pictures, including The Russia House, a 1990 film starring Sean Connery and Michelle Pfeiffer, and 2005's The Constant Gardener. Le Carré was born in Poole, Dorsetshire, England in 1931. He attended Bern University in Switzerland from 1948-49 and later completed a B.A. at Lincoln College, Oxford in 1956. Married twice, he has four sons: Simon, Stephen, Timothy, and Nicholas.

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