The Statistical Account of Scotland: Drawn Up from the Communications of the Ministers of the Different Parishes, Volume 19

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Sir John Sinclair
W. Creech, 1797 - Scotland
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Page 92 - We cam na here to view your warks In hopes to be mair wise, But only, lest we gang to hell, It may be nae surprise : But whan we tirled at your door, Your porter dought na hear us ; Sae may, should we to hell's yetts come, Your billy Satan sair us...
Page 340 - Sun to the Northwards of the Way of the Earth. At which Time, had the Earth been there, the Comet would have had a Parallax equal to that of the Moon, as I take it. This is...
Page 267 - The rock Soulifker lieth four leagues to the eaft of Rona ; it is a quarter of a mile in Circumference, and abounds with great numbers of fea-fowl, fuch as Solan geefe, guillamote, coulter-neb, puffin, and feveral other forts. The fowl called the. colk is found .here : it is lefs than a goofe, all covered with down, and when it hatches it cafts its feathers, which are of divers colours ; it has a tufft on its head refembling...
Page 91 - ... where coke is used ; while hot it is beaten out into plates about an inch in thickness. These plates are afterwards broken into pieces about two inches square, for the convenience of scouring them, &c ; and they are then scoured in an iron-cylinder which is connected with the • • water-wheel > and when they are properly prepared by this operation, they are put into pots, which are made of fire-clay, and in an air-furnace they are brought into a welding heat.
Page 557 - P. Kinnoul, Perthshire, Stat. Ace. XVIII. 560. The same useful work contains an anecdote, which, at least from the circumstances, is worthy of insertion here. The article was written A. 1795 or 1796. "There is a very respectable man in Longforgan, [Perthshire,] of the name of Smith, a weaver, and the farmer of a few acres of land, who has in his possession a stone, which is called Wallace's Stone. It is what was formerly called in this country a bear stone, hollow like a large mortar, and was made...
Page 557 - ... respectable man in Longforgan, [Perthshire,] of the name of Smith, a weaver, and the farmer of a few acres of land, who has in his possession a stone, which is called Wallace's Stone. It is what was formerly called in this country a bear stone, hollow like a large mortar, and was made use of to unhusk the bear or barley, as a preparation for the pot, with a large wooden mell, long before barley-mills were known. Its station was on one side of the door, and covered with a flat stone for a seat,...
Page 141 - The parifh-church ftands at the diftance of about two miles and a half from the fort.
Page 562 - Masses, or the island where mass is said. It was endowed with many privileges and immunities by David and Alexander, Kings of Scotland. The edifices of this abbey, which were once extensive, are now in ruins, and have, on several occasions, supplied abundance of stones for building houses and making roads in the neighbourhood. The few remains of this ancient abbey, with six or seven acres of land in the immediate vicinity, belong to the Earl of Kinnoul, who, in consequence of...
Page 369 - Those affected with it, when in a paroxysm, often leap or spring in a very surprising manner, whence the disease has derived its vulgar name. They frequently leap from the floor to what, in cottages, are called the baulks, or those beams by which the rafters are joined together. Sometimes they spring from one to another with the agility of a cat, or whirl round one of them with a motion resembling the fly of a jack. At other times they run with astonishing velocity to some particular place out of...
Page 136 - Surrey of Old and New Aberdeen, with the adjacent Country between the Rivers Dee and Don.

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