The Abenaki Indians: their treaties of 1713 & 1717, and a vocabulary ; with a historical introduction

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Printed by Brown Thurston, 1859 - History - 25 pages
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Page 22 - July, in the twelfth year of the Reign of our Sovereign Lady Anne, by the Grace of God, of Great Britain, France, and Ireland, Queen, Defender of the faith, &c.
Page 35 - But the main stay of Iroquois polity was the system of totemship. It was this which gave the structure its elastic strength ; and but for this, a mere confederacy of jealous and warlike tribes must soon have been rent asunder by shocks from without or discord from within. At some early period, the Iroquois...
Page 32 - Year of the Reign of our Sovereign Lord George, by the Grace of God, King of Great Britain, France and Ireland, Defender of the Faith, &c.
Page 35 - Iroquois probably formed an individual nation; for the whole people, irrespective of their separation into tribes, consisted of eight totemic clans ; and the members of each clan, to what nation soever they belonged, were mutually bound to one another by those close ties of fraternity which mark this singular institution. Thus the five nations of the confederacy were laced together by an eight-fold band; and to this hour their slender remnants cling to one another with invincible tenacity.
Page 35 - ... tribes east of the Mississippi, yet its prevalence is so general, and its influence on political relations so important, as to claim especial attention. Indian communities, independently of their local distribution into tribes, bands, and villages, are composed of several distinct clans. Each clan has its emblem, consisting of the figure of some bird, beast, or reptile; and each is distinguished by the name of the animal which it thus bears as its device; as, for example, the clan of the Wolf,...
Page 22 - Whereas for some years last past, we have made a breach of our Fidelity and Loyalty to the Crown of Great Britain, and have made open Rebellion against her Majesty's subjects, the English, inhabiting' the Massachusetts, New Hampshire and other her Majesty's Territories in New England; and being now sensible of the miseries which we and our People are reduced unto thereby :
Page 24 - Indians for any real or supposed wrong or injury done on the one side or the other, no private revenge shall be taken by the Indians for the same, but proper application shall be made to her...
Page 32 - We do Disapprove & Condemn the same, and freely Consent that our English Friends shall Possess, Enjoy & Improve all the Lands which they have formerly Possessed, and all which they have obtained a Right & Title unto; Hoping it will prove of mutual and reciprocal Benefit and Advantage to them and us, that they Cohabit with us.
Page 32 - Saco, and other the Eastern Parts of His Majesty's Province aforesaid, having had the several...
Page 23 - Bay ; together with all islands, inlets, shores, beaches and fishery within the same, without any molestation or claims by us or any other Indians, and be in no ways molested, interrupted, or disturbed therein.

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