Register of Debates in Congress: Comprising the Leading Debates and Incidents of the Second Session of the Eighteenth Congress: [Dec. 6, 1824, to the First Session of the Twenty-fifth Congress, Oct. 16, 1837] Together with an Appendix, Containing the Most Important State Papers and Public Documents to which the Session Has Given Birth: to which are Added, the Laws Enacted During the Session, with a Copious Index to the Whole .., Volume 8; Volume 55

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Gales & Seaton, 1832 - United States
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Page 2993 - That the freedom of speech and debates or proceedings in parliament ought not to be impeached or questioned in any court or place out of parliament.
Page 3411 - Government created by this compact was not made the exclusive or final judge of the extent of the powers delegated to itself; since that would have made its discretion, and not the constitution, the measure of its powers; but that as in all other cases of compact among parties having no common judge, each party has an equal right to judge for itself, as well of infractions as of the mode and measure of redress.
Page 3457 - We hold these truths to be self-evident, that, whenever any form of government becomes destructive of these ends" (life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness), "it is the right of the people to alter or to abolish it...
Page 3525 - The south, in the same intercourse, benefiting by the agency of the north, sees its agriculture grow and its commerce expand.
Page 3103 - Resolved by the senate and house of representatives of the United States of America in congress assembled (two-thirds of both houses concurring,) That the following article be proposed to the legislatures of the several states as an amendment to the constitution of the United States...
Page 2939 - That it is now necessary to declare, that, to report any opinion, or pretended opinion, of his Majesty upon any bill, or other proceeding, depending in either House of Parliament, with a view to influence the votes of the members, is a high crime and misdemeanour, derogatory to the honour of the Crown, a breach of the fundamental privileges of Parliament, and subversive of the constitution of this country...
Page 2933 - ... affairs concerning the king, state, and the defence of the realm, and of the church of England, and the making and maintenance of laws, and redress of mischiefs and grievances, which daily happen within this realm, are proper subjects and matter of counsel and debate in parliament ; and that, in the handling and proceeding of those businesses, every member of the house hath, and of right ought to have, freedom of speech, to propound, treat, reason, and bring to conclusion the same...
Page 2919 - Fifthly, that there is not the highest standing court in this land that ought to enter into competency either for dignity or authority with this high court of parliament, which with your Majesty's royal assent gives laws to other courts, but from other courts receives neither laws nor orders.
Page 2913 - Each House may punish, by imprisonment, during their session, any person not a member, who shall be guilty of disrespect to the House, by any disorderly or contemptuous behavior in their presence ; provided, such imprisonment shall not, at any one time, exceed twenty-four hours.
Page 3105 - And as they bound him with thongs, Paul said unto the centurion that stood by, Is it lawful for you to scourge a man that is a Roman and uncondemned?

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