The Golden Chersonese and the Way Thither

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G. P. Putnam's sons, 1883 - China - 483 pages
 

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Page 343 - Sultan receive and provide a suitable residence for a British Officer to be called Resident, who shall be accredited to his Court, and whose advice must be asked and acted upon on all questions other than those touching Malay Religion and Custom.
Page 48 - Ladrones,' or thieves, from the notorious habits of the old inhabitants. It is situated off the south-eastern coast of China, at the mouth of the Canton river, about 40 miles east of Macao.
Page 285 - Where falls not rain, or hail, or any snow, Or ever wind blows loudly." We placed our names, with the date of ascent, in a tin within a crevice, and descended to the Ledge, sitting on the smooth granite, getting our feet into cracks and against projections, and letting ourselves down by our hands, "Jim...
Page 406 - Thus departed Hiawatha, Hiawatha the Beloved, In the glory of the sunset, In the purple mists of evening, To the regions of the home-wind, Of the Northwest- Wind, Keewaydin, To the Islands of the Blessed, To the Kingdom of Ponemah, To the Land of the Hereafter!
Page 175 - ... to the knees, and clasped in front with gold, and frequently with diamond ornaments. They also wear gold or silver pins in their hair,. and the sarong is girt or held up by a clasp of enormous size and often of exquisite workmanship, in the poorer class of silver, and in the richer of gold jewelled with diamonds and rubies. The sarong of the men does not reach much below the knee, and displays loose trousers. They wear above it a short-sleeved jacket, the baju, beautifully made, and often very...
Page 175 - Their hair is black, straight, and shining, and the women dress it in a plain knot at the back of the head. To my thinking both sexes are decidedly ugly, and there is a coldness and aloofness of manner about them which chills one even where they are on friendly terms with Europeans, as the people whom we visited were with Mrs. Biggs. The women were lounging about the houses, some cleaning fish, others pounding rice; but they do not care for work, and the little money which they need for buying clothes...
Page 211 - ... carefully secluded, all forming the (relatively) important village of Permatang Pasir. Up to this time we had expected to find perfectly smooth sailing, as a runner was sent from Malacca to the Resident yesterday. We supposed that we should be carried in chairs six miles through the jungle to a point where a gharrie could meet us, and that we should reach the Residency by nine tonight at the latest. On arriving at Sempang, Mr. Hayward had sent a canoe to this place with instructions to send another...
Page 472 - Government; but their special objects should be, the maintenance of peace and law, the initiation of a sound system of taxation, with the consequent development of the resources of the country, and the supervision of the collection of the revenue...
Page 168 - ... own most of the plantations up the country, and have obtained the finest site on the hill behind the town for their stately tombs. Every afternoon their carriages roll out into the country, conveying them to their substantial bungalows to smoke and gamble. They have fabulous riches in diamonds, pearls, sapphires, rubies, and emeralds. They love Malacca, and take a pride in beautifying it. They have fashioned their dwellings upon the model of those in Canton, but whereas cogent reasons compel...

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