Duplicity Theory of Vision: From Newton to the Present

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Bjørn Stabell, Ulf Stabell
Cambridge University Press, Aug 13, 2009 - Medical - 223 pages
The duplicity theory of vision concerns the comparisons (both differences and similarities) and interaction between the cone and rod systems in the visual pathways, with the assumption that the cone system is active during daylight vision and the rod system functions in low light (night time). Research on this aspect of vision dates back to the 17th century and the work of Newton, and is still ongoing today. This book describes the origin and development of this fundamental theory within vision research - whilst also examining the Young-Helmholtz trichromatic colour theory, and the opponent colour theory of Hering - and presents evidence and ideas in light of modern conceptions of the theory. Written for academic researchers and graduate students, the book brings back knowledge of the tradition of duplicity theory, inspiring questions related to anatomy, comparative biology, molecular biology, photochemistry, physiology, genetics, phylogenetics and psychophysics.
 

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Contents

The Newton tradition
7
The Schultze tradition
22
the phenomenological approach
41
The colour theories of Armin Tschermak
52
The development of the duplicity theory
61
The duplicity theory of R Granit
78
Contributions of E N Willmer P Saugstad
86
Status of the duplicity theory in the mid 1960s and
105
photochemical sensitivity
140
Relationship between amount of rhodopsin
147
Postreceptor sensitivity regulation mechanisms
157
Contribution of H B Barlow
169
The DowlingRushton equation refuted
175
Several mechanisms involved in sensitivity regulation
186
Modern conceptions of sensitivity regulation
192
Summary of K R Poppers and TS Kuhns models
199

Mechanisms of chromatic rod vision in scotopic
113
Rodcone interactions in mesopic vision
120
Introduction
132

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