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Books Books 1 - 10 of 165 on Every body continues in its state of rest or of uniform motion in a straight line,....
" Every body continues in its state of rest or of uniform motion in a straight line, except in so far as it may be compelled by impressed forces to change that state. "
Properties of Matter - Page 91
by Peter Guthrie Tait - 1885 - 320 pages
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The Living Age ..., Volume 254

1907
...tends to retain every material body in its) state of rest or uniform motion in a straight line except so far as it is compelled by forces to change that state. This at once raises for us the new question, May not the mass or inertia of an electron be wholly due...
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The Cornhill Magazine

England - 1908
...tends to retain every material body in its state of rest or uniform motion in a straight line, except so far as it is compelled by forces to change that state. This at once raises for us tie new question, May not the mass or inertia of an electron be due or partly...
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First Principles

Herbert Spencer - Evolution - 1864 - 602 pages
...statement of the laws of motion. The first of these laws is : Every body continues in its state of rest or of uniform motion in a straight line, except in so far as it is compelled by impressed forces to change that state," Thus Professor Tait quotes, and fully approves, that conception...
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A treatise on the dynamics of a particle, by P.G. Tait and W.J. Steele

1865
...premised, we give Newton's Laws of Motion. 58. LAW I. Every body continues in its state of rest or of uniform motion in a straight line, except in so far as it may be compelled by impressed forces to change that state. We may logically convert the assertion of...
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Mechanics for Beginners with Numerous Examples

Isaac Todhunter - Mechanics - 1867 - 350 pages
...discuss the First Law of Motion. 10. First Law of Motion. Every body continues in a state of rest or of uniform motion in a straight line, except in so far as it may be compelled to change that state by force acting on it. It is necessary to limit the meaning of...
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Mechanics for Beginners with Numerous Examples

Isaac Todhunter - Mechanics - 1867 - 350 pages
...difficulty. 133. We will here repeat the Laws of Motion. I. Every body continues in a state of rest or of uniform motion in a straight line, except in so far as it may be compelled to change that state by force acting on it. II. Change of motion is proportional to...
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Proceedings

Asia - 1870
...which is called inertia is best defined by Newton's law " Every body continues in its state of rest, or of uniform motion in a straight line, except in so far as it may be compelled by impressed forces to change that state." Now, by uniform motion we mean moving through...
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A Treatise on the Dynamics of a Particle: With Numerous Examples

Peter Guthrie Tait, William John Steele - Dynamics of a particle - 1871 - 428 pages
...premised, we give Newton's Laws of Motion. 63. LAW I. Every body continues in its state of rest or of uniform motion in a straight line, except in so far as it may be compelled by impressed forces to change that state. We may logically convert the assertion of...
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Elements of Natural Philosophy, Part 1

William Thomson Baron Kelvin, Peter Guthrie Tait - Mechanics, Analytic - 1872 - 279 pages
...illud h viribus impressis cogitur stalum suum mutare. Every body continues in its state of rest or of uniform motion in a straight line, except in so far as it may be compelled by impressed forces to change that state. 211. The meaning of the term Rest, in physical...
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Youth and Years at Oxford, in Conversation on Questions of the Day

Manthano - Apologetics - 1872 - 376 pages
...our reach. But the Newtonian law, that " every body or substance continues in its state oT rest, or of uniform motion, in a straight line, except in so far as it may be compelled by impressed forces to change thai state," cannot be accepted by human thought. "...
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