From Charity to Social Work: Mary E. Richmond and the Creation of an American Profession, Volume 13

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University of Illinois Press, 2004 - Biography & Autobiography - 288 pages
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Mary E. Richmond (1861-1928) was a contemporary of Jane Addams and an influential leader in the American charity organization movement. In this biography - the first in-depth study of Richmond's life and work - Elizabeth N. Agnew examines the contributions of this important, if hitherto under-valued, woman to the field of charity and to its development into professional social work. Orphaned at a young age and largely self-educated, Richmond initially entered charity work as a means of self-support, but came to play a vital role in transforming philanthropy - previously seen as a voluntary expression of individual altruism - into a valid, organized profession. Her career took her from charity organization leadership in Baltimore and Philadelphia to an executive position with the prestigious Russell Sage Foundation in New York City. Richmond's progressive civic philosophy of social work was largely informed by the social gospel movement. She strove to find practical applications of the teachings of Christianity in response to the social problems that accompanied rapid industrialization, urbanization, and poverty. created an appealing, if ambiguous, path for other professional women. A century later her legacy continues to echo in social work and welfare reform.
 

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Contents

Introduction
1
A Craving for Friendship
17
Literature the Social Gospel and the Work of Charity
36
Organized Charity Friendly Visiting and the Social
62
Families and the Circle of Reform
95
Shaping a Civic Profession
132
Social Work in the Great
168
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