Things Fall Apart: A Novel (Google eBook)

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Knopf Doubleday Publishing Group, Oct 6, 2010 - Fiction - 224 pages
2360 Reviews
Things Fall Apart tells two intertwining stories, both centering on Okonkwo, a “strong man” of an Ibo village in Nigeria. The first, a powerful fable of the immemorial conflict between the individual and society, traces Okonkwo’s fall from grace with the tribal world. The second, as modern as the first is ancient, concerns the clash of cultures and the destruction of Okonkwo's world with the arrival of aggressive European missionaries. These perfectly harmonized twin dramas are informed by an awareness capable of encompassing at once the life of nature, human history, and the mysterious compulsions of the soul.


From the Trade Paperback edition.
  

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5 stars
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Elegant writing + laudable premise = loved it. - Goodreads
This book was confusing and hard to read. - Goodreads
An incredible read with a fantastic ending. - Goodreads
The plot was rather dry. - Goodreads
Amazing. True insight into colonialism in Africa. - Goodreads
The ending is so deflating. - Goodreads

Review: Things Fall Apart (The African Trilogy #1)

User Review  - Justin Limardo - Goodreads

Achebe's Things Fall Apart was truly a unique novel. Told from a third person point of view, the story successfully focused on the observations of the main character, Okonkwo. Although the setting is ... Read full review

Review: Things Fall Apart (The African Trilogy #1)

User Review  - Kabir Motwani - Goodreads

Things Fall Apart is written in a 3rd person, all knowing point of view that supports African culture. Chinua Achebe seemed to have written Things Fall Apart as a way to expose the degradation of ... Read full review

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About the author (2010)

Chinua Achebe was born in Nigeria in 1930. His first novel, Things Falls Apart, became a classic of international literature and required reading for students worldwide. He also authored four subsequent novels, two short-story collections, and numerous other books. He was the David and Marianna Fisher University Professor and Professor of Africana Studies at Brown University and, for over 15 years, was the Charles P. Stevenson Jr. Professor of Languages and Literature at Bard College. In 2007, Achebe was awarded the Man Booker International Prize for lifetime achievement. He died in 2013.

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