The Works of George Berkeley ...: Philosophical works, 1734-52: The analyst. A defence of free-thinking in mathematics. Reasons for not replying to Mr. Walton's "full answer." Siris. Letters ... on the virtues of tar-water. Farther thoughts on tar-water. Appendices: A. Berkeley's rough draft of the Introduction to the Principles of human knowledge. B. Arthur Collier. C. Samuel Johnson and Jonathan Edwards. D. Some of Berkeley's early critics. E. An essay 'Of infinites' by Berkeley

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Clarendon Press, 1901
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Page 328 - Since all things that exist are only particulars, how come we by general terms?' His answer is, 'Words become general by being made the signs of general ideas' (Essay on Human Understanding, b.
Page 331 - For it is evident, we observe no footsteps in them, of making use of general signs for universal ideas; from which we have reason to imagine, that they have not the faculty of abstracting, or making general ideas, since they have no use of words, or any other general signs.
Page 326 - Whether others have this wonderful faculty of abstracting their ideas, they best can tell; for myself, I find indeed I have a faculty of imagining, or representing to myself, the ideas of those particular things I have perceived, and of variously compounding and dividing them. I can imagine a man with two heads, or the upper parts of a man joined to the body of a horse. I can consider the hand, the eye, the nose, each by itself abstracted or separated from the rest of the body. But then whatever...
Page 235 - ... esse apibus partem divinae mentis et haustus 220 aetherios dixere ; deum namque ire per omnes terrasque tractusque maris caelumque profundum ; hinc pecudes, armenta, viros, genus omne ferarum, quemque sibi tenues nascentem arcessere vitas...
Page 363 - Berkeley ; and indeed most of the writings of that very ingenious author, form the best lessons of scepticism which are to be found either among the ancient or modern philosophers, Bayle not excepted.
Page 322 - It is a hard thing to suppose that right deductions from true principles should ever end in consequences which cannot be maintained or made consistent. We should believe that God has dealt more bountifully with the sons of men than to give them a strong desire for that knowledge which he had placed quite out of their reach.
Page 331 - For example, does it not require some pains and skill to form the general idea of a triangle (which is yet none of the most abstract, comprehensive, Ch. 7. Maxim. 163 and difficult), for it must be neither oblique, nor rectangle, neither equilateral, equicrural, nor scalenon ; but all and none of these at once.
Page 263 - ... the early time of life ; active, perhaps, to pursue, but not so fit to weigh and revise. He that would make a real progress in knowledge must dedicate his age as well as youth, the later growth as well as first fruits, at the altar of Truth.
Page 359 - That, which truly is the Substance of all Bodies, is the infinitely exact, and precise, and perfectly stable Idea, in God's mind, together with his stable Will, that the same shall gradually be communicated to us, and to other minds, according to certain fixed and exact established Methods and Laws...
Page 121 - ... in the entrance of philosophy, when the second causes, which are next unto the senses, do offer themselves to the mind of man, if it dwell and stay there, it may induce some oblivion of the highest cause; but when a man passeth on...

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