Two Cultures: Essays in Honour of David Speiser

Front Cover
Kim Williams
Springer Science & Business Media, Nov 17, 2005 - Mathematics - 202 pages

The extraordinary range of cultural interests of renowned physicist David Speiser—including the sciences, art, architecture, music, and history of science—has inspired generations of later scientists to look beyond the boundaries of their own disciplines. In this book, seventeen scholars from various fields pay tribute to his multifaceted career, addressing topics as varied as music theory and the nuclear arms race.

 

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Contents

IV
13
V
25
VI
39
VII
45
VIII
59
IX
71
X
73
XI
97
XIV
139
XV
153
XVI
155
XVII
159
XVIII
167
XIX
179
XX
181
XXI
189

XII
115
XIII
133
XXII
195
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Page 7 - Actually, of course, the longest statement of Leonardo on method is thoroughly Aristotelian in character: To me it seems that those sciences are vain and full of errors which are not born of experience, the mother of all certainty, and which do not end in experience observed, that is, whose origin or middle or end do not come to us through any of the five senses. . . . But the true sciences are those in which experience has penetrated through the senses and...
Page 9 - The number 2 is a very dangerous number: that is why the dialectic is a dangerous process. Attempts to divide anything into two ought to be regarded with much suspicion. I have thought a long time about going in for further refinements: but in the end I have decided against. I was searching for something a little more than a dashing metaphor, a good deal less than a cultural map: and for those purposes the two cultures is about...
Page 7 - Durand's functionalized theory is already a theory of architecture in the contemporary sense: replete with the modern architect's obsessions, thoroughly specialized, and composed of laws of an exclusively prescriptive character that purposely avoid all reference to philosophy or cosmology.
Page 6 - ... and finding them much worthier of study than I had first thought, I began to measure all their parts minutely and with the greatest care.

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