Forbidding Wrong in Islam: An Introduction

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Cambridge University Press, May 27, 2003 - History - 185 pages
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"Michael Cook's massive study in Islamic ethics, Commanding Right and Forbidding Wrong in Islamic Thought, was published to much acclaim in 2001. It was described by one reviewer as a masterpiece. In that book, the author reflected on the Islamic injunction, incumbent on every Muslim, to forbid wrongdoing. The present book is a short, accessible survey of the same material. Using anecdotes and stories from Islamic sources to illustrate the argument, Cook unravels the complexities of the subject. Moving backwards and forwards through time, he demonstrates how the past informs the present. By the end, the reader will be familiar with a colourful array of characters from Islamic history ranging from the celebrated thinker Ghazzali, to the caliph Harun al-Rashid, to the Ayatollah Khumayni. The book educates and entertains - at its heart, however, is an important message about the Islamic tradition, its values, and the relevance of those values today".--p. [1]
 

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Contents

Introduction
1
1 Terminology
3
2 Religious allegiances
5
3 Sources
7
The elements of the duty of forbidding wrong
11
2 Who?
13
3 To whom?
21
4 About what?
22
6 Concluding remarks
95
What was forbidding wrong like in practice?
97
1 What wrongs do people commit?
98
2 Who actually forbids wrong?
102
3 Forbidding the wrongs of rulers
105
4 Forbidding wrong and rebellion
108
5 Concluding remarks
110
What has changed for the Sunnis in modern times?
111

How is wrong to be forbidden?
27
1 With the tongue
28
2 With the hand
29
3 Recourse to the heart
35
4 Are there other ways to forbid wrong?
38
5 Concluding remarks
42
When is one unable to forbid wrong?
45
2 The efficacy condition
48
3 The sideeffects condition
51
4 The danger condition
53
What about privacy?
57
2 Dont expose a respectable Muslim
61
3 Concluding remarks
62
The state as an agent of forbidding wrong
65
positive views
68
negative views
70
The state as an agent of wrongdoing
73
2 Rebuking rulers as forbidding wrong
74
3 Rebellion as forbidding wrong
79
Is anyone against forbidding wrong?
83
1 Does anyone deny the duty outright?
84
2 Has the future already arrived?
86
3 What do the Sufis have to say?
88
4 Abd alGhanl alNabulus
91
5 Minding ones own business
93
attraction and repulsion
113
activism and quietism
118
4 Towards forbidding wrong in an Islamic state
122
5 Religious policing in Saudi Arabia
125
6 Forbidding wrong and privacy
129
What has changed for the Imamis in modern times?
131
attraction and repulsion
132
from quietism to activism
134
4 Towards forbidding wrong in an Islamic state
137
5 Forbidding wrong and privacy
141
6 Concluding remarks
144
Do nonIslamic cultures have similar values?
147
2 PreIslamic Arabia
149
3 Rabbinic Judaism
152
4 Medieval Catholicism
153
5 Nonmonotheist parallels?
156
6 Forbidding wrong and monotheism
157
7 The distinctiveness of the Islamic case
159
Do we have a similar value?
163
2 Rescue and forbidding wrong
165
3 Right and wrong
167
4 Concluding remarks
170
Index
173
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About the author (2003)

Michael Cook is Cleveland E. Dodge Professor of Near Eastern Studies, Department of Near Eastern Studies, Princeton University. His publications include Early Muslim Dogma (1981), The Koran: A Very Short Introduction (2000) and Commanding Right and Forbidding Wrong in Islamic Thought (2000).

Patricia Crone was born on March 28, 1945 in Kyndelose, Denmark. She received undergraduate and doctoral degrees from the School of Oriental and African Studies at the University of London. She taught at Oxford University and Cambridge University before joining the Institute for Advanced Study, an independent research center, where she was a professor from 1997 until retiring in 2014. She explored archaeological records and contemporary Greek and Aramaic sources to challenge views on the roots and evolution of Islam. She wrote numerous books during her lifetime including Hagarism: The Making of the Islamic World written with Michael Cook, God's Rule: Government and Islam: Six Centuries of Medieval Islamic Political Thought, and The Nativist Prophets of Early Islamic Iran. She died from cancer on July 11, 2015 at the age of 70.

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