Malaŵi and Madagascar

Front Cover
World Bank, 1990 - Literary Collections - 470 pages
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Malawi and Madagascar are poor, agricultural nations that have had very different degrees of economic success over the past quarter century. The economic ideologies of their governmental leaders have been, respectively, capitalist and socialist; and the two countries have pursued quite different strategies of economic development. This is the first book in the English language focusing on the economic systems and long-term economic policies of either country. Using the framework of the "New Political Economy," it attempts to answer three critical questions: Why have these nations chosen such different types of economic institutions and strategies of development? With what types of policies have these governments tried to realize their different goals? What has been the impact of such policies and their implementation on both economic growth and the distribution of income? The author shows clearly the linkages between agricultural policies designed to accelerate growth and the unintended widening of rural income differentials that resulted in both countries and how these relationships provided the basic mechanism underlying economic performance. The comparison of the experiences of these two nations serves not just to advance our knowledge of Africa, but also to illustrate some general forces linking poverty, equity, and growth in all developing nations.
 

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Contents

Background to the Economy of Malawi
21
Economic Growth in Malawi
43
Property and Production Policies
67
LaborIntensive Approaches
77
Summary and Conclusions
92
Foreign Trade and the Balance of Payments in Malawi
124
Manufacturing and Transportation in Malawi
146
The Government Sector in Malawi
169
Product and Factor Markets
261
Agricultural Prices
267
The Credit Market in the Rural Sector
276
Summary and Conclusions
282
Trade Policies
292
Some Implications
304
XII
328
The Distribution of Income in Malawi
351

Background to the Economy of Madagascar
197
Economic Growth in Madagascar
219
Property and Production Policies
241
LaborIntensive Approaches
247
LargeScale Agriculture
253
Explorations in Political Economy
377
Appendix
403
Bibliography
437
Index
459
Copyright

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About the author (1990)

Frederic L. Pryor, a Senior Research Scholar at Swarthmore College, is one of the world's leading specialists in the comparative study of economic systems. His career has spanned both the academic and the consulting worlds. In addition to teaching at Swarthmore, Professor Pryor has also been affiliated with the University of California, Stanford, the University of Michigan, Indiana University, and several universities in France and Switzerland. His academic work includes the authorship of twelve books, including Economic Evolution and Structure: The Impact of Complexity on the U.S. Economic System (1996), Who's Not Working and Why: Employment, Cognitive Skills, Wages, and the Changing U.S. Labor Market (1999, coauthored with David L. Schaffer), and The Future of U.S. Capitalism (2002), all published by Cambridge University Press. He has also written more than one hundred articles in professional journals, primarily on the comparative study of different economic systems. As an economic consultant and researcher, Professor Pryor has worked at a variety of positions for the World Bank, several departments of the U.S. government, the Danish government, the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania, the Soros International Economic Advisory Group in Ukraine, the Hoover Institution, the Brookings Institution, and the Wissenschaftszentrum Berlin. He also serves on the boards of several nonprofit institutions.