Jahrbuch der Deutschen Shakespeare-Gesellschaft, Volume 38

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G. Reimer, 1902
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Page 246 - To make a child now swaddled, to proceed Man, and then shoot up, in one beard and weed, Past threescore years...
Page 316 - FROM fairest creatures we desire increase, That thereby beauty's rose might never die, But as the riper should by time decease, His tender heir might bear his memory : But thou, contracted to thine own bright eyes, Feed'st thy light's flame with self-substantial fuel, Making a famine where abundance lies, Thyself thy foe, to thy sweet self too cruel. Thou that art now the world's fresh...
Page xxxii - Let four captains Bear Hamlet, like a soldier, to the stage ; For he was likely, had he been put on, To have proved most royally : and, for his passage, The soldiers' music and the rites of war Speak loudly for him.
Page 214 - The sun is in the heaven, and the proud day, Attended with the pleasures of the world, Is all too wanton, and too full of gawds, To give me audience : — If the midnight bell Did, with his iron tongue and brazen mouth, Sound one unto the drowsy race of night...
Page 155 - Did throng the seats, the boxes, and the stage ; So much, that some by Stenography drew The plot, put it in print, (scarce one word true...
Page 93 - Kit. Let him tell over straight that Spanish gold, And weigh it, with the pieces of eight. Do you See the delivery of those silver stuffs To Master Lucar: tell him, if he will, He shall have the grograns, at the rate I told him, And I.
Page 233 - What child is there that, coming to a play, and seeing Thebes written in great letters upon an old door, doth believe that it is Thebes?
Page 38 - I have been in the Indies, where this herb grows, where neither myself, nor a dozen gentlemen more of my knowledge, have received the taste of any other nutriment in the world, for the space of one and twenty weeks, but the fume of this simple only: therefore, it cannot be, but 'tis most divine.
Page 271 - To beg the voice and utterance of my tongue, A curse shall light upon the limbs of men ; Domestic fury and fierce civil strife Shall cumber all the parts of Italy...
Page 313 - Faith, here's an equivocator, that could swear in both the scales against either scale; who committed treason enough for God's sake, yet could not equivocate to heaven :O come in, equivocator.

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