Pamphlets: Japanese Exhibit. World's Fair, Chicago, 1893

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1893
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Page 51 - ... to produce the fiber. In Japan hemp is ready for harvesting about one hundred and twenty days after sowing, or about the 20th of July. • In harvesting, the plants are pulled, leaves and roots are cut off with a sickle, and the stems sorted into long, medium, and short lengths and bound in bundles. These bundles are steamed for a few minutes in a steaming bath specially constructed, and dried in a sunny situation for three days, when they are fit for keeping to be manipulated according to the...
Page 52 - ... of days, until they are completely dried, when they are kept in a dry place for future work. For preparing the best quality of hemp fibers, the drying process takes thirty days, and for second and third qualities, fifteen and twenty-five days, respectively, are required. For separating hemp fibers from the stalk, the bundles treated as above mentioned are immersed in water and moderately fermented by heaping them upon a thick bed of straw mats in a barn specially built for the purpose. The number...
Page 51 - ... sunny situation for three days, when they are fit for keeping to be manipulated according to the condition of the weather, if favorable or unfavorable. If good, settled weather is anticipated, three bundles of the stems above mentioned are made into one bundle, exposed to the sun by turning upside down once a day for about three days, then dipped into water and exposed again to the sun for a number of days, until they are completely dried, when they are kept in a dry place for future work. For...
Page 51 - ... medium, and short lengths and bound in bundles. These bundles are steamed for a few minutes in a steaming bath specially constructed, and dried in a sunny situation for three days, when they are fit for keeping to be manipulated according to the condition of the weather, if favorable or unfavorable. If good, settled weather is anticipated, three bundles of the stems above mentioned are made into one bundle, exposed to the sun by turning upside down once a day for about three days, then dipped...
Page 93 - ... they are cut into thin slices and spread over mats and exposed to the sun for two or three days. In order to make a superior quality the skin of the potato is .peeled off before slicing.
Page 51 - ... unfavorable. If good, settled weather is anticipated, three bundles of the stems above mentioned are made into one bundle, exposed to the sun by turning upside down once a day for about three days, then dipped into water and exposed again to the sun for a number of days, until they are completely dried, when they are kept in a dry place for future work. For preparing the best quality of hemp fibers, the drying process takes thirty days, and for second and third qualities, fifteen and twenty-five...
Page 97 - A first return of 7. 7s. 6d. per share will be made forthwith, and the balance at the end of April, or in the beginning of May. The liquidators now retire, and the liquidation will be made with all possible despatch.
Page 86 - The first cutting of the plant is done in the middle of July, and the second in the middle of September, and sometimes, but rarely, a third cutting is made in some districts. The plant reaped is dried under a shed without exposing to the sun and carefully kept for future distilling.
Page 84 - ... described for from two to three years, they are immersed in water for twenty-four hours in the middle of November, and again laid one upon another for about four days; if it is a cold district, the pile is covered with straw or mats. At the expiration of the fourth day the logs are obliquely tilted against poles fixed horizontally to the trees at a height of about 4 feet in a well ventilated and sunny situation. The mushrooms soon appear in quantity, and, after twenty or thirty days' growth,...
Page 64 - Moreover, the fibres of Ganpi and Mitsumata are not strong enough singly, yet they are extensively used with other coarse raw materials in order to give the tenderness, smoothness, and lustre to paper of low quality.

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