Driving Forces in Physical, Biological and Socio-economic Phenomena: A Network Science Investigation of Social Bonds and Interactions

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Cambridge University Press, May 31, 2007 - Business & Economics - 254 pages
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This book was first published in 2007. In recent years network science has become a dynamic and promising discipline; here it is extended to explore social and historical phenomena. While we experience social interactions every day, there is little quantitative knowledge on them. Instead we are often tempted to resort to fanciful explanations to explain social trends. Exogenous and endogenous interactions are often the key to understanding social phenomena and unravelling historical mysteries. This book begins by explaining how it is possible to bridge the gap between physics and sociology by exploring how network theory can apply to both. It then examines the macro- and micro-interactions in societies. The chapters are largely self-contained, allowing readers easily to access and understand the sections of most interest. This multi-disciplinary book will be fascinating to all physicists who have an interest in the human sciences and it will provide an alternative perspective to graduate students and researchers in sociology and econophysics.
 

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Contents

Probing bonds
3
The battle against noise in physics
26
The battle against noise in the social sciences
35
Equilibrium and metastable states
62
Are the data reliable?
80
Shaping the Zeitgeist
105
Bonds of vassalage
135
The absentee ownership syndrome
150
Effects of a malefemale imbalance
173
Effect of weakened marital bonds on suicide
192
Effect of social isolation on suicide
205
Apoptosis
231
Perspectives
241
Index
252
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Page 250 - Ageon, Y. (2004). Endogenous versus exogenous shocks in complex networks: An empirical test using book sale rankings.
Page 247 - Lund, E. (1993). Suicide among women related to number of children in marriage.

About the author (2007)

Bertrand Roehner is a Professor at the Institute for Theoretical and High Energy Physics at the University of Paris, France. He has written several books on econophysics, including Patterns of Speculation (Cambridge University Press, 2002).

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