Politics, Society, and Democracy Latin America

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Scott Mainwaring, Arturo Valenzuela
Westview Press, Dec 1, 1998 - Political Science - 284 pages
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This is the third of four volumes compiled in honor of Juan J. Linz and edited by H. E. Chehabi, Richard Gunther, Alfred Stepan, and Arturo Valenzuela. Each volume presents original research and theoretical essays by Linz’s distinguished collaborators, students, teachers, and friends, as well as overviews of his enormous contributions to Spanish and Latin American studies, comparative politics, and sociology.In Volume III, leading Latin American scholars evaluate Juan Linz’s contribution to the study of Latin American politics, in particular his influence on studies dealing with authoritarianism, democratic breakdown, public opinion, regime transition, and the institutional conditions needed for stable democracy.
 

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Contents

Juan Linz and the Study
1
The Failure of Presidential Authoritarianism
27
Communist States as Ideocracies?
49
A Comparative
71
Political Continuities Missed Opportunities
101
The Crisis of PresidentiaMsm in Latin America
121
The Evolution of Latin American Party Systems
171
Regionalism and Federalism in Brazil
207
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Page 118 - Douglass C. North, Institutions, Institutional Change and Economic Performance (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1990). 29. For this, see Charles Tilly, Coercion, Capital, and European States (Cambridge and Oxford: Blackwell, 1992); "War Making and State Making as Organized Crime...
Page 2 - Linz defines authoritarian regimes as "political systems with limited, not responsible, political pluralism, without elaborate and guiding ideology, but with distinctive mentalities, without extensive nor intensive political mobilization, except at some points in their development, and in which a leader or occasionally a small group exercises power within formally illdefined limits but actually quite predictable ones
Page 7 - Our criteria for a democracy may be summarized as follows: legal & freedom to formulate and advocate political alternatives with the concomitant *• rights to free association, free speech, and other basic freedoms of person; free and nonviolent competition among leaders with periodic validation of their claim to rule; inclusion of all effective political offices in the democratic process; and provision for the participation of all members of the political community, whatever their political preferences.
Page 7 - Linz's influential definition, "legitimacy is the belief that in spite of shortcomings and failures, the existing political institutions are better than any others that might be established, and that they therefore can demand obedience.
Page 261 - Adam Przeworski and Henry Teune, The Logic of Comparative Social Inquiry (New York: Wiley, 1970); Arend Lijphart, "Comparative Politics and the Comparative Method," American Political Science Review 65, no. 3 (1971): 682-93; Arend Lijphart, "The Comparable Cases Strategy in Comparative Research," Comparative Political Studies 8, no.
Page 232 - Juan J Linz and Amando de Miguel: -Within- Nation Differences and Comparisons: The Eight Spains-, in: Richard L Merritt and Stein Rokkan (eds.).
Page 205 - Daniel H. Levine, Conflict and Political Change in Venezuela (Princeton: Princeton University Press, 1973...

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About the author (1998)

Scott Mainwaringis chairperson of the Government Department at the University of Notre Dame. He is the author of The Party System and Democratization in Brazil and The Catholic Church and Politics in Brazil, 1916–1985 and coeditor of Presidentialism and Democracy in Latin America and Building Democratic Institutions: Party Systems in Latin America. Arturo Valenzuelais professor of government and director of the Center for Latin American Studies at Georgetown University. Scott Mainwaringis chairperson of the Government Department at the University of Notre Dame. He is the author of The Party System and Democratization in Brazil and The Catholic Church and Politics in Brazil, 1916–1985 and coeditor of Presidentialism and Democracy in Latin America and Building Democratic Institutions: Party Systems in Latin America. Arturo Valenzuelais professor of government and director of the Center for Latin American Studies at Georgetown University.

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