In Fair Aroostook: Where Acadia and Scandinavia's Subtle Touch Turned a Wilderness Into a Land of Plenty

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Bangor & Aroostook Railroad Company, 1902 - Acadians - 94 pages
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Page 23 - Maidens still wear their Norman caps and their kirtles of homespun, And by the evening fire repeat Evangeline's story, While from its rocky caverns the deep-voiced, neighboring ocean Speaks, and in accents disconsolate answers the wail of the forest.
Page 57 - ... Scandinavian stock, separated in the ninth century, are now brought together again after the lapse of a thousand years, and dwell side by side in the woods of Maine. There are few better towns in Maine for agricultural purposes than New Sweden. On every hand the land rolls up into gentle hard-wood ridges, covered with a stately growth of maple, birch, beech, and ash. In every valley between these ridges flows a brook, and along its banks grow the spruce, fir, and cedar. The soil is a rich, light...
Page 57 - ... colonists together. 4. Let the commissioner lead the colony in a body, all together, at one time, and aboard one ship, from Sweden to America. Thus would they be made acquainted with one another. Thus, also, would they have a leader to follow and be prevented from going astray. 5. Let the commissioner take the Swedes into our northern forests, locate them on Township Number 15, Range 3, west of the east line of the state, give every head of a family one hundred acres of woodland for a farm, and...
Page 63 - ... to find work in the slate quarries of Piscataquis county, in the great tanneries and saw-mills of Penobscot, and in the stores and workshops of Portland, Bangor, Augusta, Pittsfield, Monson, Houlton, Presque Isle, Fort Fairfield, Caribou, and other cities and towns. Since the founding of the colony the Swedish girls have ever furnished needed and valuable help in our families in all sections of the state. Some Swedish immigrants, who came to us in independent circumstances, purchased improved...
Page 63 - ... Since the founding of the colony the Swedish girls have ever furnished needed and valuable help in our families in all sections of the state. Some Swedish immigrants, who came to us in independent circumstances, purchased improved farms in Presque Isle, Fort Fairfield, Limestone, and other towns; while many Swedes with less means settled on abandoned farms in Cumberland, York and our other older counties. These deserted homesteads have been placed by the Swedes in a high state of cultivation;...
Page 33 - Acadia refugees and others. Named from the fort erected in 1841, which was named for Governor Kent. Incorporated February 23, 1869, and embraces all of No. 18, R. 7. and most of No. 18, R. 6.
Page 63 - Sweden are not confined to this colony or this vicinity. As early as 1871 Swedish artisans and skilled workmen, drawn to Maine by New Sweden, began to find work in the slate quarries of Piscataquis county, in the great tanneries and saw-mills of Penobscot, and in the stores and workshops of Portland, Bangor, Augusta, Pittsfield, Monson, Houlton, Presque Isle, Fort Fairfield, Caribou, and other cities and towns. Since the founding of the colony the Swedish girls have ever furnished needed and valuable...
Page 55 - ... but do we know, can we calculate, how many blows of the ax, how many drops of sweat have been expended in turning each one of these seven thousand six hundred acres of cleared land, from forest to farm ? The story of New Sweden has no parallel in New England since the United States became a Nation. This Swedish settlement is the only successful agricultural colony founded with foreigners from over the ocean in New England since the Revolutionary war, and surely in all America there is no agricultural...
Page 57 - ... of Maine had kept its faith with them in every particular; that the land was fertile, the climate pleasant, the people friendly, and advising their countrymen emigrating to America to come to the New Sweden in Maine. This letter was published in full in all the leading journals throughout Sweden. The only animals taken into the woods by the colony were two kittens, picked up by Swedish children on our drive in from Tobique. On Wednesday, August 3, WILLIAM WIDGEBT THOMAS PERSSON, [First child...
Page 57 - ... in Nova Scotia as in Maine. No hotel or boarding-house would receive us, and our colony was forced to pass its first night on this continent in a large vacant warehouse kindly placed at our disposal by the Messrs. Seaton, the agents of the Inman steamships. Next day we continued our journey across the peninsula of Nova Scotia and over the Bay of Fundy to the city of St. John. July 15, we ascended the St. John River to Frederic ton by steamer.

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