Study of Man: General Education Course : Fourteen Lectures Given in Stuttgart Between 21 August and 5 September 1919

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Rudolf Steiner Press, Mar 17, 2004 - Psychology - 190 pages
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14 lectures, Stuttgart, Aug.-Sept. 1919 (CW 293)

Although these lectures were given to teachers as preparatory material, they are by no means concerned only with education. Study of Man is Steiner s most succinct presentation of his human-centered spiritual psychology, and it is accessible to anyone genuinely interested in the questions of human existence. His approach is unique because it considers not only the influences that affect humanity from the past, but also future states of consciousness and being.

Reprinted here in the original classic translation by A.C. Harwood and Helen Fox, these lectures were given in 1919 to the teachers of the Waldorf school in Stuttgart the first to be based on the educational ideas of Rudolf Steiner. After eighty-five years of Waldorf education and exponential growth around the world this volume remains the basic study text for teachers in Steiner schools. As well as providing a basis for the work of educators, Study of Man will be of special interest to parents, counselors, psychologists, and students of Rudolf Steiner s philosophy for whom this volume provides a fundamental picture of the human being according to the anthroposophic understanding of the world.

This book is a translation of Allgemeine Menschenkunde als Grundlage der Padagogik (GA 293), published by Rudolf Steiner Nachlassverwaltung, Dornach."

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About the author (2004)

Austrian-born Rudolf Steiner was a noted Goethe (see Vol. 2) scholar and private student of the occult who became involved with Theosophy in Germany in 1902, when he met Annie Besant (1847--1933), a devoted follower of Madame Helena P. Blavatsky (1831--1891). In 1912 he broke with the Theosophists because of what he regarded as their oriental bias and established a system of his own, which he called Anthroposophy (anthro meaning "man"; sophia sophia meaning "wisdom"), a "spiritual science" he hoped would restore humanism to a materialistic world. In 1923 he set up headquarters for the Society of Anthroposophy in New York City. Steiner believed that human beings had evolved to the point where material existence had obscured spiritual capacities and that Christ had come to reverse that trend and to inaugurate an age of spiritual reintegration. He advocated that education, art, agriculture, and science be based on spiritual principles and infused with the psychic powers he believed were latent in everyone. The world center of the Anhthroposophical Society today is in Dornach, Switzerland, in a building designed by Steiner. The nonproselytizing society is noted for its schools.

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