The King's Own

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Fireship Press, 2009 - Fiction - 448 pages
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From the Father of Modern Nautical Fiction The King's Own, written in 1830, was the second book from Frederick Marryat's pen. The plot takes place about the time of the Nore and Spithead mutinies (1797). A man is hanged for his role in those events, but his son is adopted by the seamen on his old ship. We see him move through the ranks from ship's boy, to midshipman, to lieutenant; but part of the mystery of the young man is the broad anchor that is branded on his arm. It's the same symbol that is on all of the King's possessions aboard ship. We learn that his father was, in fact, the legitimate son of high born gentleman, making the young man his heir. Neither he nor anyone else, however, understands the significance of the anchor, which proves his birth and his heritage. This is one of Marryat's darker books, one which goes into a great deal of grisly detail of the realities of shipboard life. Despite the pain and sorrow, it is an exciting read and established Marryat's reputation as a serious writer.

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About the author (2009)

Frederick Marryat was born on July 10, 1792 in London, England. He entered the Royal Navy at the age of 14 and served with distinction in many parts of the world before retiring in 1830 with the rank of captain. From 1832 to 1835, he edited the Metropolitan Magazine. His first novel, The Naval Officer, was published in 1829. His other adult novels include Mr. Midshipman Easy, The Kings Own, Newton Forster, Peter Simple, Jacob Faithful, and The Phantom Ship. He also wrote a number of children's books including Masterman Ready, Settlers in Canada, The Mission, The Children of the New Forest, and The Little Savages. He travelled in Canada and the United States from 1837 to 1839. Afterward, he recorded his impressions in A Diary in America. He died on August 9, 1848.

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