Concept of the Corporation

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Transaction Publishers, Aug 1, 2009 - Business & Economics - 329 pages
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Concept of the Corporation was the first study ever of the constitution, structure, and internal dynamics of a major business enterprise. Basing his work on a two-year analysis of the company done during the closing years of World War II, Drucker looks at the General Motors managerial organization from within. He tries to understand what makes the company work so effectively, what its core principles are, and how they contribute to its successes. The themes this volume addresses go far beyond the business corporation, into a consideration of the dynamics of the so-called corporate state itself.

When the book initially appeared, General Motors managers rejected it as unfairly critical and antibusiness. Yet, the GM concept of the corporation and its principles of organization later became models for organizations worldwide. Not only businesses, but also government agencies, research laboratories, hospitals, and universities have found in Concept of the Corporation a basis for effective organization and management.

Because it offers a fundamental theory of corporate goals, this book is a valuable resource for business professionals and organization analysts. It will also be of interest to students and professionals in economics, public administration, and political science. Professional and technical readers who admire Peter Drucker's work will want to be certain this volume is in their personal library. At a time when everything from the size to the structure of corporations is being questioned, this classic should prove a valuable guide.

 

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read in an article by John Kay in FT.

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Contents

CHAPTER ONE CAPITALISM IN ONE COUNTRY
2
THE CORPORATION AS HUMAN EFFORT
21
2 Decentralization
42
3 How Well Does It Work?
73
4 The Small Business Partner
99
5 Decentralization as a Model?
116
THE CORPORATION AS A SOCIAL INSTITUTION
131
The Industrial Middle Class
164
3 The Worker
177
ECONOMIC POLICY IN AN INDUSTRIAL SOCIETY
210
2 Production for Use or for Profit
231
3 Is Full Employment Possible?
265
EPILOGUE 1983
292
INDEX
324
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Page 17 - On the contrary it should be so organized as to fulfill automatically its social obligations in the very act of seeking its own best self-interest.
Page 15 - American society must hold out the promise of adequately fulfilling the aspirations and beliefs of the American people. A conflict between the requirements of corporate life and the basic beliefs and promises of American society would ultimately destroy the allegiance to our form of government and society. Hence, we must analyze whether the corporation is satisfying these basic demands: the promise that opportunities be equal and rewards be commensurate to abilities and efforts; the promise that...
Page 7 - What we look for in analyzing American society today is therefore the institution which sets the standard for the way of life and the mode of living of our citizens; which leads, molds and directs; which determines our perspective on our own society; around which crystallize our social problems and to which we look for their solution.
Page 6 - Big Business is the general condition of modern industrial society irrespective of the forms of social organization or the political beliefs adopted in particular countries. Even to raise the question whether Big Business is desirable or not is therefore nothing but sentimental nostalgia. The central problem of all modern society is not whether we want Big Business but what we want of it, and what organization of Big Business and of the society it serves is best equipped to realize our wishes and...

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About the author (2009)

Peter F. Drucker (1909-2005) is known by many as the father of modern management. He was Clarke Professor of Social Science and Management at Claremont Graduate School in California and was a recipient of the Presidential Medal of Freedom. He is the author of over thirty-five books, including The Ecological Vision, The Concept of the Corporation, and A Functioning Society.

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