Memoirs of the Kings of Spain of the House of Bourbon: From the Accession of Philip V. to the Death of Charles III. 1700 to 1788. Drawn from the Original and Unpublished Documents, Volume 2

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Longman, Hurst, Rees, Orme, and Brown, 1815 - Spain
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Page 129 - ... since ; but such was the fame of her administration of affairs at home, such was the reputation of her wisdom and felicity in choosing ministers, and such was then esteemed their faithfulness and zeal, their diligence and great abilities in executing her commands ; to such a height of military glory did her great general and her armies carry the British name abroad ; such was the harmony and concord betwixt her and her allies...
Page 130 - O that it had altogether spared the places sacred to his worship!) to spoil, for a time, this beautiful and pleasing prospect; and give us, in its stead, I know not what Our enemies will tell the rest with pleasure.
Page 129 - Faithful •> nefs and Zeal, their Diligence and great Abilities in executing her Commands; to fuch a height of military Glory did her great General and her Armies carry the...
Page 273 - Oh, my lord duke, these are wild ideas, thus to involve two young and innocent sovereigns in the utmost distress ! In a word, this is leading the world to imagine that a few mad Italians, from attachment to their native country, have urged the king to the extermination and ruin of Spain. " Without allies, the catholic king cannot hope to conquer Italy, particularly at a time when he has neither troops, nor money, nor able commanders. With three kingdoms • more disaffected than ever, with a people...
Page 129 - ... ministers, and such was then esteemed their faithfulness and zeal, their diligence and great abilities in executing her commands ; to such a height of military glory did her great general and her armies carry the British name abroad; such was the harmony and concord betwixt her and her allies ; and such was the blessing of God upon all her...
Page 129 - Never did seven such years together pass over the head of any English monarch, nor cover it with so much honour: the crown and sceptre seemed to be the queen's least ornaments; those other princes wore in common with her, and her great personal virtues were the same before and since; but such was the fame of her administration of affairs at home, such was the reputation of her wisdom and felicity in...
Page 173 - \Vhere shall we discover such a person ?" he rapidly recapitulated the princely families of Europe ; and then, as if by accident recollecting himself, carelessly mentioned Elizabeth Farnese, daughter of Edward, deceased Duke of Parma, adding, with the same tone of simplicity and indifference, " She is a good girl, plump, healthy, and well fed, brought up in the petty court of her uncle, Duke Franci", and accustomed to hear of nothing but needle-work and embroidery." He dexterously adverted also...
Page 129 - ... esteemed, and honoured by their subjects and their friends, nor near so formidable to their enemies. We were, as all the world imagined then, just entering on the ways that promised to lead to such a peace as would have answered all the prayers of our religious queen the care and vigilance of a most able ministry, the payments of a willing and obedient people, as well as all the glorious toils and hazards of the soldiery; when God, for...
Page 130 - Ihe places sacred to his worship !) to spoil for a time this beautiful and pleasing prospect, and give us in its stead, — I know not what. Our enemies will tell the rest with pleasure.
Page 243 - ... Italy. Besides the natural desire of regaining these, the Queen of Spain, as a Princess of Parma, had claims to the eventual succession of that Duchy and of Tuscany, and was most anxious to acquire the guarantee of them for one of the Infants. " In " short,

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