Christian Economics

Front Cover
Rivingtons, 1888 - Christianity - 278 pages
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 254 - For though they be punished in the sight of men, yet is their hope full of immortality. And having been a little chastised, they shall be greatly rewarded: for God proved them, and found them worthy for himself. As gold in the furnace hath he tried them, and received them as a burnt offering. And in the time of their visitation they shall shine, and run to and fro like sparks among the stubble. They shall judge the nations, and have dominion over the people, and their Lord shall reign for ever.
Page 166 - ... but speaking the truth in love, may grow up into him in all things, which is the head, even Christ : From whom the whole body fitly joined together, and compacted by that which every joint supplieth, according to the effectual working in the measure of every part, maketh increase of the body, unto the edifying of itself in love.
Page 198 - Nay but, O man, who art thou that repliest against God? Shall the thing formed say to him that formed it, "Why hast thou made me thus ? " Hath not the potter power over the clay, of the same lump to make one vessel unto honour, and another unto dishonour?
Page 41 - So God created man in his own image, in the image of God created he him; male and female created he them. And God blessed them, and God said unto them, Be fruitful, and multiply, and replenish the earth, and subdue it: and have dominion over the fish of the sea, and over the fowl of the air, and over every living thing that moveth upon the earth.
Page 166 - One body and one spirit, even as 'we' are called in one hope of 'our' calling. One Lord, one faith, one baptism, one God and Father of all, who is above all and through all and in ' us
Page 82 - There was a certain rich man, which was clothed in purple and fine linen, and fared sumptuously every day : and there was a certain beggar named Lazarus, which was laid at his gate, full of sores, and desiring to be fed with the crumbs which fell from the rich man's table : moreover the dogs came and licked his sores.
Page 50 - And the eye cannot say to the hand, ' I have no need of thee ' ; nor again the head to the feet,
Page 198 - But now, O Lord, thou art our father ; We are the clay, and thou our potter; And we all are the work of thy hand.
Page 198 - Woe unto him that striveth with his Maker! Let the potsherd strive with the potsherds of the earth. Shall the clay say to him that fashioneth it, What makest thou? or thy work, He hath no hands?
Page 108 - Consider the lilies of the field; they toil not, neither do they spin: yet Solomon in all his glory was not arrayed like one of these.

Bibliographic information