The Great Deluge

Front Cover
HarperCollins, Oct 13, 2009 - History - 768 pages
159 Reviews

In the span of five violent hours on August 29, 2005, Hurricane Katrina destroyed major Gulf Coast cities and flattened 150 miles of coastline. But it was only the first stage of a shocking triple tragedy. On the heels of one of the three strongest hurricanes ever to make landfall in the United States came the storm-surge flooding, which submerged a half-million homes—followed by the human tragedy of government mismanagement, which proved as cruel as the natural disaster itself.

In The Great Deluge, bestselling author Douglas Brinkley finds the true heroes of this unparalleled catastrophe, and lets the survivors tell their own stories, masterly allowing them to record the nightmare that was Katrina.

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Review: The Great Deluge: Hurricane Katrina, New Orleans, and the Mississippi Gulf Coast

User Review  - Goodreads

Brings back all the vicarious anguish we went through during Katrina, while describing the horrors on the ground and in the water. Few "leaders" come off well in this catastrophe. The NOPD appears to ... Read full review

Review: The Great Deluge: Hurricane Katrina, New Orleans, and the Mississippi Gulf Coast

User Review  - Linda Nichols - Goodreads

Brings back all the vicarious anguish we went through during Katrina, while describing the horrors on the ground and in the water. Few "leaders" come off well in this catastrophe. The NOPD appears to ... Read full review

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About the author (2009)

Douglas Brinkley is a professor of history at Rice University, the CNN Presidential Historian, and a contributing editor at Vanity Fair and Audubon. The Chicago Tribune has dubbed him “America’s new past master.” His recent Cronkite won the Sperber Prize for Best Book in Journalism and was a Washington Post Notable Book of the Year. The Great Deluge won the Robert F. Kennedy Book Award. He is a member of the Society of American Historians and the Council on Foreign Relations. He lives in Austin, Texas, with his wife and three children.

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