The Novelist's Magazine, Volume 17

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Harrison and Company, 1784 - English fiction
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Page 210 - Was ever woman in this humour woo'd ? Was ever woman in this humour won ? I'll have her, but I will not keep her long.
Page 55 - ... hunting, was independent of all society, and suffered no want as an individual. Others thought of a slave immediately after emancipation, because, being just relieved from the severities of servitude, he would have a more lively sense of the sweets of freedom. And there were some who said that a man at the point of death was more free than all others, because death breaks every bond, and over the dead the united world has no power. " When my opinion was demanded, I was in no doubt what to answer,...
Page 214 - ... extend calamity to the end of time. A king knows that he is always surrounded by flatterers : should he not therefore suppose, that, upon such occasions, he will be flattered ? If he leaves his differences to arbitration, he shows himself candid, equitable, and dispassionate: he states the reasons upon which his claim is founded : the umpire is an amicable mediator, not a rigorous judge...
Page 56 - ... sagacity, can discover the merit of others, and can defend his country when it is attacked, if not in person, yet by his generals, is, in my opinion, to be preferred before him who knows no art but that of war: a prince whose genius is entirely military, will levy endless wars to extend his dominions, and ruin his people to add a new title to his name. If the nation which he now governs...
Page 160 - ... given way. At this dreadful intelligence they ran to arms, assembled the leaders, and gave orders for the camp to be immediately abandoned, that the men might not perish in the conflagration. Telemachus, who had been pining with inconsolable dejection, forgot his anguish in a moment, and resumed his arms. His arms were the gift of Minerva, who, under the figure of Mentor, pretended to have received them from an excellent artificer of Salentum ; but they were, indeed, the work of Vulcan, who,...
Page 123 - ... should incorporate with your people; they will think themselves happy to pass their lives under a government so gentle as that which you have now established; and as they are robust and laborious, their example will animate the transplanted artificers with whom they will be mixed; and, in a short time, your country will abound with a vigorous race wholly devoted to agriculture. "When this is done, be in no pain about the multiplication of your people; they will, in a short time, become innumerable...
Page 102 - This war has been kindled by the jealousy which you have excited in your neighbours; and by removing that jealousy, it will be extinguished. Once more I entreat you to leave the management of this affair to me.
Page 59 - ... obscure and inconsiderable island of Ithaca, to the hundred cities of Crete, with all their opulence and glory. Permit me, therefore, to wander wherever the Fates shall have marked my course. If I have contended in your sports, I was not prompted by a desire to govern you, but only to...
Page 87 - that the earth should not have room for its inhabitants? There will always be much more land than can be cultivated; and while any remains unappropriated by cultivation, we should think it folly to defend even our own against those who would invade it.
Page 165 - ... bloody and disfigured, from the spot where it lay hidden under a heap of the slain ; he -was touched with a pious sorrow, and wept over it. " O mighty shade !" said he, " thou art not now ignorant of my reverence for thy valour. Thy haughtiness, indeed, provoked me : but thy fault was from the ardour of youth. Alas ! I know but too well how much youth has need of pardon. We were in the way to be united by friendship : O why have the gods snatched thee from me, before I had an opportunity to compel...

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