A memoir of ... Richard Butler, by his widow

Front Cover
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Selected pages

Contents

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 242 - I have truly heard and examined, so have I reduced these things to writing ; and lest the writing should perish with the writer, and the work fail together with the workman, I leave parchment for continuing the work, if haply any man survive, and any of the race of Adam escape this pestilence and continue the work which I have commenced.
Page 260 - Ireland, during the earlier part of the fourteenth century, as represented in these annals, and such, with little alteration, it continued to be for several generations. Whatever were the faults of the several parties, in this long and bitter struggle — and no doubt all parties had great and grievous faults,— they were the faults rather of the times than of the men. At all events, it little becomes any Irishman of the present day to reproach their memories. He can scarcely do so without reproaching...
Page 258 - The country was fast verging towards anarchy, and it was not easy to stay its descent. The sword of the Lord Justice, if put into the hands of any of the native lords, of the Ormondes or of the Kildares, was used as an instrument to avenge their own wrongs, or to promote their own interests, rather than to execute impartial justice, and to promote the welfare of the whole country. Such also was the case during the lieutenancy of any of the great English lords, who had estates or claims...
Page 241 - That pestilence deprived of human inhabitant villages and cities, and castles and towns, so that there was scarcely found a man to dwell therein : the pestilence was so contagious that whosoever touched the sick or the dead was immediately infected and died ; and the penitent and the confessor were carried together to the grave.
Page 100 - If I could only write down half-an-hour's conversation in this drawing-room now, my letters would be worth something. We have now Maria Edgeworth with us, as cheerful and as fresh as ever, and neither sadness, nor ill-nature, nor anything very bad can stand long in her presence.
Page 251 - ... more to the good of the kingdom, since the creation of the world, and since the banishment of the Fine Fomores out of this land, done in Ireland, than the killing of Edward Bruce; for there reigned scarcity of victuals, breach of promises, ill performance of covenants, and the loss of men and women, throughout the whole kingdom, for the space of three years and a half that he bore sway; insomuch that men did commonly eat one another, for want of sustenance, during his time.
Page 252 - ... the farmer, as he looked about him in despair, might well be excused if he fled away to some safer country ; or if, listening to hunger, that evil counsellor, he became an idilman or a kerne, ready to plunder as he had been plundered, and eating up the produce of other men's labours. If he endeavoured to remain, what was before him, but, poor and dispirited, deprived of his accustomed comforts, and of his comparative respectability, to sink hopelessly into a lower...
Page 258 - Ireland, such as the great Mortimers ; and, perhaps, nothing brought the royal authority into greater disrepute than the use of it by these men as a cover for private revenge or for private gain. Nor were the evils fewer, if the administration of the Government was intrusted to Englishmen unconnected with this country. Men of eminence, so situated, would scarcely accept the office ; we know that Pembridge altogether refused it ; and men of inferior rank and reputation, when invested with deputed...
Page 244 - The facts mentioned in the earlier parts of Clyn's Annals are, for the most part, common to all the Anglo-Irish annalists, and are to be found, with little variety of expression, in Pembridge and Grace, and the Annals of Multifernanh. It would appear, however, from the following pages, that Clyn's Calendar differed from that of the English and Roman Churches, which was received in Ireland ; at least if the transcript from which we print is correct, which is very doubtful, it will follow that the...
Page 237 - ... were often told why this Baron bestowed the rich farm, and why it was leased to such a Knight ; why this Lady founded an altar and a chaplaincy, and why such a Burgess was commemorated with a double Lection. Every name in the registry was made the text of some grave homily, or recalled some story, kept alive, not only by being repeated on every recurring anniversary...

Bibliographic information