Hudibras: In Three Parts. Written in the Time of the Civil Wars. By Samuel Butler, Esq

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B. Long, and T. Pridden, 1773 - 382 pages
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Page 20 - For rhetoric, he could not ope His mouth, but out there flew a trope ; And when he happen'd to break off I' th' middle of his speech, or cough, H...
Page 23 - For he was of that stubborn crew Of errant saints, whom all men grant To be the true church militant ; Such as do build their faith upon The holy text of pike and gun ; Decide all controversies by Infallible artillery ; And prove their doctrine orthodox By apostolic blows and knocks...
Page 26 - Upon his shoulders through the fire, Our Knight did bear no less a pack Of his own buttocks on his back : Which now had almost got the upperHand of his head for want of crupper : To poise this equally, he bore A paunch of the same bulk before...
Page 17 - Th' adventure of the bear and fiddle Is sung, but breaks off in the middle. When civil fury first grew high, And men fell out, they knew not why; When hard words, jealousies, and fears, Set folks together by the ears...
Page 31 - We shall not need to say what lack Of leather was upon his back ; For that was hidden under pad, And breech of Knight gall'd full as bad: His strutting ribs on both sides...
Page 19 - He'd undertake to prove, by force Of argument, a man's no horse; He'd prove a buzzard is no fowl, And that a lord may be an owl, A calf an alderman, a goose a justice, And rooks committee-men and trustees. He'd run in debt by disputation, And pay with ratiocination. All this by syllogism, true In mood and figure, he would do.
Page 169 - What makes all doctrines plain and clear? About two hundred pounds a year. And that which was proved true before, Prove false again? Two hundred more.
Page 27 - To old king Harry so well known, Some writers held they were his own. Through they were lin'd with many a piece Of ammunition bread and cheese, And fat black-puddings, proper food...
Page 138 - To sum up this long rigmarole, I have, dear B , what you no doubt perceive, for the metaphysical poets, as poets, the most sovereign contempt. That they have followers proves nothing — No Indian prince has to his palace More followers than a thief to the gallows.
Page 18 - And styled of war as well as peace. (So some rats of amphibious nature Are either for the land or water.) But here our authors make a doubt Whether he were more wise or stout.

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