Focusing-Oriented Psychotherapy: A Manual of the Experiential Method

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Guilford Press, Jul 27, 2012 - Psychology - 317 pages
Examining the actual moment-to-moment process of therapy, this volume provides specific ways for therapists to engender effective movement, particularly in those difficult times when nothing seems to be happening. The book concentrates on the ongoing client therapist relationship and ways in which the therapist's responses can stimulate and enable a client's capacity for direct experiencing and "focusing." Throughout, the client therapist relationship is emphasized, both as a constant factor and in terms of how the quality of the relationship is manifested at specific times. The author also shows how certain relational responses can turn some difficulties into moments of relational therapy.
 

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Contents

Introduction
1
FOCUSING AND LISTENING
5
Dead Ends
7
Eight Characteristics of an Experiential Process Step
16
What the Client Does to Enable an Experiential Step to Come
25
What a Therapist Can Do to Engender an Experiential Step
41
The Crucial Bodily Attention
57
Focusing
69
Experiential Dream Interpretation
199
Imagery
212
Emotional Catharsis Reliving
221
Action Steps
227
Cognitive Therapy
238
A Process View of the Superego
247
The LifeForward Direction
259
Values
264

Excerpts from Teaching Focusing
76
Problems of Teaching Focusing during Therapy
104
Excerpts from One Clients Psychotherapy
112
INTEGRATING OTHER THERAPEUTIC METHODS
167
A Unified View of the Field through Focusing and the Experiential Method
169
Working with the Body A New and Freeing Energy
181
Role Play
192
It Fills Itself In
276
The ClientTherapist Relationship
283
Should We Call It Therapy?
299
Bibliography and Resources
305
Index
311
Copyright

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About the author (2012)

Eugene T. Gendlin, Ph.D., is Professor of Psychology at the University of Chicago. He is the founder and was, for many years, the editor of Psychotherapy: Theory, Research and Practice.
For his development of experiential psychology, he was chosen by the Psychotherapy Division of the American Psychological Association for their first "Distinguished Professional Psychologist" award. He is the author of many books and articles. The Focusing Institutes in Chicago, Illinois, and Spring Valley, New York, offer training in focusing and focusing-oriented psychotherapy

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